Comments
How NOT To Be The Next Sony: Defending Against Destructive Attacks
Newest First  |  Oldest First  |  Threaded View
Page 1 / 2   >   >>
jamieinmontreal
50%
50%
jamieinmontreal,
User Rank: Strategist
1/20/2015 | 9:32:21 AM
Don't be a Sony Pictures Entertainment....
Well put together article Sara and I think you're spot on with the view that data breaches (once they have happened) need to take methodologies from physical disaster response policies.    Equally, I think the world of prevention needs to move it's focus from building walls and start looking way more at identity and access management.   As long as we have been building walls, we have been building bigger catapults, longer ladders, better mining tools, smaller infiltration components etc. it's a losing proposition to continue on this road for tech, bad guys get paid too much to make the breach happen.

A few years ago Symantec started declaring the bad guys had already won and wanted to build out identity profiling for potential threat actors on your environment.   There are a lot of good Enterprise Access and Governance organisations out there with solid tools to eliminate or mitigate risk in this arena, IAM should be high on the C-suite agenda and the recent pushes to standardisation and definition of Cybersecurity policy based on executive orders only serve to underline this fact.
chrisbunn
50%
50%
chrisbunn,
User Rank: Apprentice
1/12/2015 | 9:54:51 AM
Insider Threats need to be a C Suite concern
Your right. The Insider Threat is not just about corporate data or financial reward. Today's world offers many different opportunties for the insider threat. Critical services that society relies on are dependent on computers and seen as potentially vulnerable to security attacks. To avoid being the 'next' Sony Insider Threat story, insider threats need to continue to move in priority and become an executive and board-level concern. 

The good news is that there is a lot that organizations can do now. Building an Insider Threat Program helps move an organization from paranoia to protection. This means involving a sophisticated tool set, staff and manager's awareness and an efficient process. 
aaaaaaaadfzdfazef
50%
50%
aaaaaaaadfzdfazef,
User Rank: Apprentice
1/12/2015 | 9:52:15 AM
Helping avoid being the next Insider Threat story
Your right. The Insider Threat is not just about corporate data or financial reward. Today's world offers many different opportunties for the insider threat. Critical services that society relies on are dependent on computers and seen as potentially vulnerable to security attacks. To avoid being the 'next' Sony Insider Threat story, insider threats need to continue to move in priority and become an executive and board-level concern. 

The good news is that there is a lot that organizations can do now. Building an Insider Threat Program helps move an organization from paranoia to protection. This means involving a sophisticated tool set, staff and manager's awareness and an efficient process. 
ArthurTisi
50%
50%
ArthurTisi,
User Rank: Apprentice
1/10/2015 | 3:40:06 PM
We need to expand awareness to home users more
Recent pieces written by Brian Krebs reinforces how opportunitstic groups like LizardSquad are using botnets to infultrate not only corporate network devices but home devices as well.  Homeusers need to practice a little more discipline with passwords and the like, using the default is not a viable option.

Arthur Tisi

 
Sara Peters
50%
50%
Sara Peters,
User Rank: Author
1/9/2015 | 11:04:36 AM
Re: because...
@Kelly  Yeah, I mean I'm sympathetic to Sony's disaster recovery plight, because I'm sure they didn't think that an information security breach could cause that much damage. It definitely makes the point that the same people who build DR plans for natural disasters need to be working on DR plans for digital disasters.
Sara Peters
50%
50%
Sara Peters,
User Rank: Author
1/9/2015 | 10:47:52 AM
Re: Single Point of Failure
@RyanSepe  I think that a lot of security pros out there need to take your comments to their CEO/CFO to help them get approval for a bigger IT security staff.  :)
Sara Peters
50%
50%
Sara Peters,
User Rank: Author
1/9/2015 | 10:40:43 AM
Re: because...
@McDaveX  :)  Yeah, I think that organizations would rather focus on the "unprecedented" damage than admit to the fact that they got compromised by the same, old ordinary methods.
RyanSepe
100%
0%
RyanSepe,
User Rank: Ninja
1/9/2015 | 10:03:46 AM
Single Point of Failure
I am a strong advocate for not allowing a single point of failure. Some corporations may find an excessive overlapping of responsibilities redundant. The contrary not only represents a security hole but also a valid business risk as your employees do have the right to take off, leave the corporation, etc. There are many issues involved with a single point of failure. Enterprise needs to realize people are not as predicatable as computation. For that reason and a few others such as a knowledge challenge there needs to be responsibilities that overlap.
Marilyn Cohodas
100%
0%
Marilyn Cohodas,
User Rank: Strategist
1/9/2015 | 9:57:31 AM
Re: because...
Speaking about Incident Response plans, look no further than our latest flash poll (click or mosey over the right side, column and scroll down) to see that IR is not exactly a pressing priority within the Dark Reading community. 40 percent of respondents say they don't even have a plan!
Kelly Jackson Higgins
100%
0%
Kelly Jackson Higgins,
User Rank: Strategist
1/9/2015 | 9:40:58 AM
Re: because...
The Sony breach was a painful example of how crucial it is for an incident response plan to be part and parcel of a security strategy. Sony's Lynton reportedly (according to the NYT) told his staff in the aftermath: "There is no playbook for us to turn to." But that's only because they didn't have a full-blown IR plan in place. If so, Sony might have had a better and quicker response, with less carnage.
Page 1 / 2   >   >>


White House Cybersecurity Strategy at a Crossroads
Kelly Jackson Higgins, Executive Editor at Dark Reading,  7/17/2018
The Fundamental Flaw in Security Awareness Programs
Ira Winkler, CISSP, President, Secure Mentem,  7/19/2018
Number of Retailers Impacted by Breaches Doubles
Ericka Chickowski, Contributing Writer, Dark Reading,  7/19/2018
Register for Dark Reading Newsletters
White Papers
Video
Cartoon Contest
Current Issue
Flash Poll
Twitter Feed
Dark Reading - Bug Report
Bug Report
Enterprise Vulnerabilities
From DHS/US-CERT's National Vulnerability Database
CVE-2018-19990
PUBLISHED: 2018-07-23
October CMS version prior to build 437 contains a Cross Site Scripting (XSS) vulnerability in the Media module and create folder functionality that can result in an Authenticated user with media module permission creating arbitrary folder name with XSS content. This attack appear to be exploitable v...
CVE-2018-19990
PUBLISHED: 2018-07-23
October CMS version prior to Build 437 contains a Local File Inclusion vulnerability in modules/system/traits/ViewMaker.php#244 (makeFileContents function) that can result in Sensitive information disclosure and remote code execution. This attack appear to be exploitable remotely if the /backend pat...
CVE-2018-19990
PUBLISHED: 2018-07-23
FFmpeg before commit cced03dd667a5df6df8fd40d8de0bff477ee02e8 contains multiple out of array access vulnerabilities in the mms protocol that can result in attackers accessing out of bound data. This attack appear to be exploitable via network connectivity. This vulnerability appears to have been fix...
CVE-2018-19990
PUBLISHED: 2018-07-23
FFmpeg before commit 2b46ebdbff1d8dec7a3d8ea280a612b91a582869 contains a Buffer Overflow vulnerability in asf_o format demuxer that can result in heap-buffer-overflow that may result in remote code execution. This attack appears to be exploitable via specially crafted ASF file that has to be provide...
CVE-2018-19990
PUBLISHED: 2018-07-23
FFmpeg before commit 9807d3976be0e92e4ece3b4b1701be894cd7c2e1 contains a CWE-835: Infinite loop vulnerability in pva format demuxer that can result in a Vulnerability that allows attackers to consume excessive amount of resources like CPU and RAM. This attack appear to be exploitable via specially c...