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How NOT To Be The Next Sony: Defending Against Destructive Attacks
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jamieinmontreal
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jamieinmontreal,
User Rank: Strategist
1/20/2015 | 9:32:21 AM
Don't be a Sony Pictures Entertainment....
Well put together article Sara and I think you're spot on with the view that data breaches (once they have happened) need to take methodologies from physical disaster response policies.    Equally, I think the world of prevention needs to move it's focus from building walls and start looking way more at identity and access management.   As long as we have been building walls, we have been building bigger catapults, longer ladders, better mining tools, smaller infiltration components etc. it's a losing proposition to continue on this road for tech, bad guys get paid too much to make the breach happen.

A few years ago Symantec started declaring the bad guys had already won and wanted to build out identity profiling for potential threat actors on your environment.   There are a lot of good Enterprise Access and Governance organisations out there with solid tools to eliminate or mitigate risk in this arena, IAM should be high on the C-suite agenda and the recent pushes to standardisation and definition of Cybersecurity policy based on executive orders only serve to underline this fact.
chrisbunn
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50%
chrisbunn,
User Rank: Apprentice
1/12/2015 | 9:54:51 AM
Insider Threats need to be a C Suite concern
Your right. The Insider Threat is not just about corporate data or financial reward. Today's world offers many different opportunties for the insider threat. Critical services that society relies on are dependent on computers and seen as potentially vulnerable to security attacks. To avoid being the 'next' Sony Insider Threat story, insider threats need to continue to move in priority and become an executive and board-level concern. 

The good news is that there is a lot that organizations can do now. Building an Insider Threat Program helps move an organization from paranoia to protection. This means involving a sophisticated tool set, staff and manager's awareness and an efficient process. 
aaaaaaaadfzdfazef
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aaaaaaaadfzdfazef,
User Rank: Apprentice
1/12/2015 | 9:52:15 AM
Helping avoid being the next Insider Threat story
Your right. The Insider Threat is not just about corporate data or financial reward. Today's world offers many different opportunties for the insider threat. Critical services that society relies on are dependent on computers and seen as potentially vulnerable to security attacks. To avoid being the 'next' Sony Insider Threat story, insider threats need to continue to move in priority and become an executive and board-level concern. 

The good news is that there is a lot that organizations can do now. Building an Insider Threat Program helps move an organization from paranoia to protection. This means involving a sophisticated tool set, staff and manager's awareness and an efficient process. 
ArthurTisi
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ArthurTisi,
User Rank: Apprentice
1/10/2015 | 3:40:06 PM
We need to expand awareness to home users more
Recent pieces written by Brian Krebs reinforces how opportunitstic groups like LizardSquad are using botnets to infultrate not only corporate network devices but home devices as well.  Homeusers need to practice a little more discipline with passwords and the like, using the default is not a viable option.

Arthur Tisi

 
Sara Peters
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Sara Peters,
User Rank: Author
1/9/2015 | 11:04:36 AM
Re: because...
@Kelly  Yeah, I mean I'm sympathetic to Sony's disaster recovery plight, because I'm sure they didn't think that an information security breach could cause that much damage. It definitely makes the point that the same people who build DR plans for natural disasters need to be working on DR plans for digital disasters.
Sara Peters
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Sara Peters,
User Rank: Author
1/9/2015 | 10:47:52 AM
Re: Single Point of Failure
@RyanSepe  I think that a lot of security pros out there need to take your comments to their CEO/CFO to help them get approval for a bigger IT security staff.  :)
Sara Peters
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Sara Peters,
User Rank: Author
1/9/2015 | 10:40:43 AM
Re: because...
@McDaveX  :)  Yeah, I think that organizations would rather focus on the "unprecedented" damage than admit to the fact that they got compromised by the same, old ordinary methods.
RyanSepe
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RyanSepe,
User Rank: Ninja
1/9/2015 | 10:03:46 AM
Single Point of Failure
I am a strong advocate for not allowing a single point of failure. Some corporations may find an excessive overlapping of responsibilities redundant. The contrary not only represents a security hole but also a valid business risk as your employees do have the right to take off, leave the corporation, etc. There are many issues involved with a single point of failure. Enterprise needs to realize people are not as predicatable as computation. For that reason and a few others such as a knowledge challenge there needs to be responsibilities that overlap.
Marilyn Cohodas
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Marilyn Cohodas,
User Rank: Strategist
1/9/2015 | 9:57:31 AM
Re: because...
Speaking about Incident Response plans, look no further than our latest flash poll (click or mosey over the right side, column and scroll down) to see that IR is not exactly a pressing priority within the Dark Reading community. 40 percent of respondents say they don't even have a plan!
Kelly Jackson Higgins
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Kelly Jackson Higgins,
User Rank: Strategist
1/9/2015 | 9:40:58 AM
Re: because...
The Sony breach was a painful example of how crucial it is for an incident response plan to be part and parcel of a security strategy. Sony's Lynton reportedly (according to the NYT) told his staff in the aftermath: "There is no playbook for us to turn to." But that's only because they didn't have a full-blown IR plan in place. If so, Sony might have had a better and quicker response, with less carnage.
Page 1 / 2   >   >>


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