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Threat Intelligence: Sink or Swim?
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RyanSepe
RyanSepe,
User Rank: Ninja
1/7/2015 | 3:32:14 PM
Forwarding of all raw Data to Event Managers
Would you recommend with the IoT that all logs from these devices get forwarded to event managers? My worry is that with emerginng technologies that these new log streams won't be able to be processed efficiently until we fully comprehend their exploits. I feel in that case logs may just become noise. Thoughts?
1eustace
1eustace,
User Rank: Strategist
1/7/2015 | 8:27:26 PM
What about privacy?
I love the idea of "community-level information sharing and analysis centers" but what about privacy? Forward event managers a winter day log in Canada that includes sudden drop in energy consumption by the furnace, missing pet door activity, garage door access, a call to the vet, another garage door access, and the event managers will deduce with high probability of success that you came home to a sick dog.  You inadvertently just gave away pertinent detail in the form of metadata.  Point is metadata is data and can reveal a lot more than actual data.  When you start sharing IoT logs, where do you draw the line to privacy?  Thoughts?
1eustace
1eustace,
User Rank: Strategist
1/7/2015 | 8:40:28 PM
Re: Forwarding of all raw Data to Event Managers
True, the volume of data would be enormous, but one could envision a solution involving distributed real-time processing by some, if not most of the IoT nodes which themselves happen to be computing devices.  This would be similar to statistical process controls (SPC) used in manufacturing whereby humans would only be alerted on anormalies for closer examination. Create a hierarchical distributed processing architecture among processor capable nodes and gateways you may end up not needing a supercomputer afterall.  Improve algorithms with experience and you might just stand the chance to eliminate false alarms.  It is actually a clever scheme, and probably an inevitable approach as IoT node count grows, but I worry about privacy as posted in another comment.
RyanSepe
RyanSepe,
User Rank: Ninja
1/8/2015 | 9:31:34 AM
Re: Forwarding of all raw Data to Event Managers
That's makes sense. I too am interested to see how the IoT will fare in terms with privacy. Also the difference in how enterprises will handle enterprise given devices versus personal devices as the security safeguards will differ from device to device.
MichaelSentonas
MichaelSentonas,
User Rank: Apprentice
1/12/2015 | 12:09:05 PM
Re: Forwarding of all raw Data to Event Managers
You bring up a really good point, most SIEM solutions today struggle as it is, so forwarding all the event information from so many additional devices will become a massive issue if you cannot correlate it quickly and an even bigger problem if you cannot remove noise.  That said, I want to know if someone unlocked a door— say in a semiconductor fabrication plant— when they were meant to be on holidays. To your point, big data can be a big problem in the security world when you are trying to find a very specific, targeted issue, but this is also when we need to move past the traditional SIEM products which are fast becoming irrelevant and adopt more analytics and contextualization.
MichaelSentonas
MichaelSentonas,
User Rank: Apprentice
1/12/2015 | 4:02:01 PM
Re: What about privacy?
Protecting privacy is critical and needs to be carefully respected with any sharing. Sharing intelligence should never weaken and compromise privacy but there is meaningful information that can be provided to help identify indicators of attack and compromise. There certainly have been a lot of proof of concept hacks on consumer based IoT devices, but it's in the business where there will likely be real threats that we will see in 2015. Last year we saw an attack that used the HVAC system, this year it is plausible that we will see attacks that will exploit IoT devices in the enterprise and then move laterally once inside. We should be capturing information from these devices and using the event information to better protect ourselves.
MichaelSentonas
MichaelSentonas,
User Rank: Apprentice
1/14/2015 | 8:24:51 PM
Device and industry threat intelligence

With all of the device and industry threat intelligence, I would love to tag all the information by source to make it easier to see what information is providing value.  If I am not getting any value from certain feeds then maybe stop using it, might be a nice "feature" especially to work out what you pay for in the upcoming year. 



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