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Long-Running Cyberattacks Become The Norm
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Trails
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Trails,
User Rank: Apprentice
1/9/2015 | 12:00:31 PM
Re: HIDS
RyanSepe - I've used them as a part of an overall strategy in a few different environments, but this was a few years ago now.  I found that in closed environments with multiple security domains they were most useful because we COULD be more limiting without having to deal with noise from some execs demanding that they not be lumped with the rest of the commoners...  But in other environments, it may not be completely realistic depending on size of the company vs. size of the IT and security teams simply due to the onslaught of events and any investigations.  Not all have time, energy and most importantly, the highest levels of support from the top floors.

Good as a part of overall strategy if you have staff that can effect real digging for tuning needed to make them effective. 
Marilyn Cohodas
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Marilyn Cohodas,
User Rank: Strategist
1/5/2015 | 3:12:37 PM
Re: This article is the beginning of a vital strategic discussion
"Most network security articles just tell you that "yeah, they got a ton of sensitive information" and "they got in using this method", but what we all need to know is what new security defense products would have worked to either keep "them" out or detect suspicious activities early."


You raise an interesting point @lancop, but I wonder what format you have in mind that kind of critical information? Are you thinking about user-generated product reviews? feature comparisons, crowd-sourcing security dfense products and strategies? 
lancop
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lancop,
User Rank: Moderator
1/5/2015 | 12:02:33 PM
This article is the beginning of a vital strategic discussion
Most network security articles just tell you that "yeah, they got a ton of sensitive information" and "they got in using this method", but what we all need to know is what new security defense products would have worked to either keep "them" out or detect suspicious activities early. Since most vendor advertising is hyperbolically hyped up, network security & admin types have to dig constantly to find out what new tools might help them in mounting a credible defense. When readers ask specific questions about what might work, it seems that reporters & bloggers go out of their way not to give any specific answers - with the probable range of explanations extending from legal liabilities to offending other advertisers. Other readers may not chime in because endorsing a particular "solution" is giving the enemy intelligence on what security products their company has deployed internally. So, at the moment, interesting reportage is just more "blah, blah, blah" about non-actionable generalities, and tomorrow will simply be another day of successful breaches and more missed opportunities to really inform or engage. Yet another modern paradigm going nowhere fast & furious...
Eric Kruse
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Eric Kruse,
User Rank: Apprentice
1/4/2015 | 12:59:58 PM
Re: HIDS
Hi Ryan,

 

You do make a interesting point and one that is commonly overlooked.  As the article pointed out typical defense in depth from the network intrustion side (not the end-point) is failing organizations.  From a detection mechanism on the endpoint various manufactors make solutions to identify, report, and block malicious activity before it happens.  This can be signature, or behavioral based in my experience.  There is no magic bullet product that can save the I.T. world from all of the dangers out there but from a cyber-intelligence perspective (kill chain) understanding / reporting at the endpoint level is critical.
RyanSepe
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RyanSepe,
User Rank: Ninja
1/2/2015 | 10:49:41 AM
HIDS
This article denotes that perimeter defenses are circumvented easily due to the methodology of infiltration but what about HIDS? I am not familiar with organizations that employ this type of intrusion detection and am curious if a HIDS Solution would have been able to discern an event.

To clarify I am familiar with HIDS from a theoretical perspective but if it applies to this article can someone explain how this works from an application standpoint in regards to infiltration and launch of malware kits? Thanks,


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