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A 2014 Lookback: Predictions vs. Reality
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Marilyn Cohodas
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Marilyn Cohodas,
User Rank: Strategist
1/6/2015 | 9:21:44 AM
Re: 2015 Predictions
Adding the live link to the Hitoshi Kokumai page on LI. Some interesting content there. Thanks for sharing @HAnatomi!

https://www.linkedin.com/today/author/141508358?trk=pulse-det-athr_posts
HAnatomi
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HAnatomi,
User Rank: Apprentice
1/1/2015 | 7:49:44 PM
Re: 2015 Predictions
I am supporting the thought and theory of Expanded Password System advocated by Hitoshi Kokumai whose writings are posted on LinkedIn at

https://www.linkedin.com/today/author/141508358?trk=pulse-det-athr_posts

 
RyanSepe
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RyanSepe,
User Rank: Ninja
12/31/2014 | 11:34:21 AM
Re: 2015 Predictions
Very interesting post. I agree with many of the statements you made.

People have difficulty remembering intricate strings, hence principles behind DNS. But I think with items such as tokens and devices, Security professionals have the right to hold people accountable to not lose the token. In an environment that requires this type of authentication being responsible is not a lofty request. That being said I understand mistakes happen.

Biometric is ideal but a very expensive means of authentication. This may not be feasible for implementation. What is your advice for a happy medium?
HAnatomi
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HAnatomi,
User Rank: Apprentice
12/31/2014 | 2:40:56 AM
Re: 2015 Predictions
The two-factor authentication, though not a silver bullet, could be reliable when it comes with a reliable password. 2 is larger than 1 on paper, but two weak boys in the real world may well be far weaker than a toughened guy.  Physical tokens and phones are easily lost, stolen and abused. Then the password would be the last resort.  It should be strongly emphasized that a truly reliable 2-factor solution needed for important accounts requires the use of the most reliable password.  

Using a strong password does help a lot even against the attack of cracking the leaked/stolen hashed passwords back to the original passwords.  The problem is that few of us can firmly remember many such strong passwords.  It is like we cannot run as fast and far as horses however strongly urged we may be.  We are not built like horses.

 At the root of the password headache is the cognitive phenomena called "interference of memory", by which we cannot firmly remember more than 5 text passwords on average.  What worries us is not the password, but the textual password.  The textual memory is only a small part of what we remember.  We could think of making use of the larger part of our memory that is less subject to interference of memory.  More attention could be paid to the efforts of expanding the password system to include images, particularly KNOWN images, as well as conventional texts.

 By the way, some people shout that the password is dead or should be killed dead.  The password could be killed only when there is an alternative to the password.  Something belonging to the password(PIN, passphrase, etc)and something dependent on the password (ID federations, 2/multi-factor, etc) cannot be the alternative to the password.  Neither can be something that has to be used together with the password (biometrics, auto-login, etc). What could be killed is the text password, not the password.  

 
RyanSepe
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RyanSepe,
User Rank: Ninja
12/29/2014 | 1:37:43 PM
2015 Predictions
Have you compiled predictions for the year 2015? If so, do you plan on creating another article to denote them?

I would be interested to see how your predictions align with the roadmapped enterprise initiatives.


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