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Why Digital Forensics In Incident Response Matters More Now
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JasonSachowski
JasonSachowski,
User Rank: Author
12/29/2014 | 9:02:03 AM
Re: Why Digital Forensics In Incident Response Matter More Now
While I agree that proven forensic tools are essential, we cannot rely on technology to catch the bad guy.  Let's not forget that in order to make these forensic tools work, knowledgeable people and established processes are equally important.
Broadway0474
Broadway0474,
User Rank: Apprentice
12/28/2014 | 11:54:46 PM
Re: Knowledge base for attacks
DrT, that is a great point about building a "knowledge base" of past attacks. It's a lesson perhaps transferable from other catastrophe types, like say hurricanes. Experts there study past hurricanes, not that one is replicable --- but more to learn how wind speeds and wave heights affect businesses, communities, etc. in the hopes of applying relatable lessons when the next hurricane comes. Agree it's similar?
Dr.T
Dr.T,
User Rank: Ninja
12/26/2014 | 9:35:32 AM
Re: Being Pro-active with Forensics
I agree on the IP address also. IP address can easily be spoofed, neither source nor destination IPs are reliable. Not even MAC address can really be used to identify the source of a message.
Dr.T
Dr.T,
User Rank: Ninja
12/26/2014 | 9:33:53 AM
Re: Being Pro-active with Forensics
Agree, being proactive and doing the require work and analyzing the treats. It needs to be taken to next level and removing vulnerabilities in the environment
Dr.T
Dr.T,
User Rank: Ninja
12/26/2014 | 9:21:52 AM
Knowledge base for attacks
 

I agree there has to be a knowledge base built for the attacks in the enterprise. This would not only help to understand and prevent from similar types of attacks but also it would give us an idea of the trend around where are being exploited and what our vulnerabilities are. The enterprise can not really continue to fight with attacks that would be very expensive in the long run, we need to understand our vulnerabilities and close them before they are being exploited.
PZav
PZav,
User Rank: Author
12/24/2014 | 1:11:55 PM
Being Pro-active with Forensics
The more I learn about the forensics work we do at RiskIQ, the more I see the value. In our case, our forensics team uses data collected from our detection technology, which scans large sections of the publich web. Our forensics teams analyze threats as they appear online. The benefit being that a potentially innocous looking infection may be tied to a more expansive and sophisticated attack infrastructure.

The reality is that many prominent threat actors share resources and just because one attack may appear to have originated from IPs tied to prior attacks, does not mean that infrastructure is owned by the same group. It could be infrastructure rented out for multiple uses. It helps us understand what our customers might be up against. 


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