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Internet Of Things: 3 Holiday Gifts That Will Keep CISOs Up At Night
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ChrisRouland
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ChrisRouland,
User Rank: Strategist
12/12/2014 | 9:16:20 AM
Re: How do we detect these devices?

Marilyn,

The MDM market is well established to help secure personal devices connected to corporate infrastructure, however host agents such as MDM's don't run on the majority of the IOT.   Broad spectrum intrusion detection, vulnerability assessment and localization will be key to managing risk around devices that are unable to run a host based security agent.

Marilyn Cohodas
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Marilyn Cohodas,
User Rank: Strategist
12/11/2014 | 4:28:21 PM
Re: How do we detect these devices?
Thanks, Chris. What do you think will be the biggest challenges with IoT in the enterprise compared to BYOD?
ChrisRouland
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ChrisRouland,
User Rank: Strategist
12/11/2014 | 10:55:04 AM
Re: How do we detect these devices?
There are certainly some short-term solutions, such as an IoT policy that segregates devices from the corporate network. Long term, however, enterprises will be responsible for implementing policies that ensure the security of their airspace, while not infringing on the personal privacy of employees, contractors, and the thousands of others who come in and out of their corporate environments each day. New technology needs to come to market to provide vulnerability assessment, intrusion detection and localization across the wide spectrum of protocols of the IoT.   With the tremendous growth of IoT, brings opportunity for innovation in security in the space.
gwilson001
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gwilson001,
User Rank: Strategist
12/10/2014 | 6:09:40 PM
Re: How do we detect these devices?
I don't think any one has policies around things like the fitness bands etc.  Policies are essential but getting people to follow them where these devices are concerned would be difficult.  You would have to update the policy everytime a new device came out that was not covered under another product category.  I can see this being a mess to manage.  Enforcement would be diufficult as well since these devices are often very small and could be tossed in a purse or backpack/gym bag and brought into the office.  Since WiFi scanners won't monitor for these devices how will we detect them? 
ODA155
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ODA155,
User Rank: Ninja
12/10/2014 | 4:15:15 PM
Re: How do we detect these devices?
@gwilson001,... I could be wrong, but I think actually "detecting" these devices is the easy part. The difficult thing for some companies would be trying to manage them or just ignoring them altogether. Personally, I'm of the mind to block ANY USB or Bluetooth device that isn't woned by the company and already registered on the network or mated with a specific computer\system. If it doesn't have a valid business need then it shouldn't be on the network regardless of who wants to use it... sometime you just have to say no.
Marilyn Cohodas
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Marilyn Cohodas,
User Rank: Strategist
12/10/2014 | 3:19:45 PM
Re: How do we detect these devices?
That/s the  million-dollar question with IoT security, @gwilson001. For an enterprise, the first step would be to create policies surrounding them. But given the popularity (& success) of BYOD policies, I'm not overly optimistic.
gwilson001
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gwilson001,
User Rank: Strategist
12/10/2014 | 2:06:39 PM
How do we detect these devices?
Interesting but not surprising article.  It outline the threat but offers no solutions.  How do we detect or otherwise manage these devices so that we can at least be aware of them before they can do damage?


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