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POS Malware Continues To Evolve
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GonzSTL
GonzSTL,
User Rank: Ninja
11/17/2014 | 11:36:50 AM
Re: Alarming
The two processes critical to the POS operation are: card data capture and communications with the transaction processor, and communications with internal back office applications.  So really, the best way to go is to ensure the security of the local machines and infrastructures. Encryption helps, no doubt, but at some point in time, the data needs to be decrypted so that processing can continue with the actual data, and this takes place within memory, the RAM scraper playground. So really, strict controls on the card transaction computing machine, stripping down services and applications to the bare minimum, file integrity protection, and anti-malware software serve to provide much needed protection to help prevent data leakage. Isolation and continuous monitoring of the card processing network help at the transaction perimeter, and strict controls on the back end internal server and external perimeter infrastructure help to prevent data exfiltration. None of these techniques are new; in fact, they are well established practices that have been preached for a very long time. It all boils down to strict controls and proper enforcement; breaches occur when those controls are violated. Upper management should make sure that there are sufficient resources to properly address and enforce those controls, and that appropriate separation of duties exist to address conflicts of interest.
Marilyn Cohodas
Marilyn Cohodas,
User Rank: Strategist
11/17/2014 | 10:08:36 AM
Retail hacking Radio Show THIS Wednesday @ Noon ET
@Dr.T -- and others. Just a reminder about our DR Radio show this week, which is totally focused on retail industry breaches:  Retail Hacking: What To Expect This Holiday Season (Wednesday at 1:00 p.m. ET (10:00 a.m. PT).  It promises to be a great show, with Kelly Jackson-Higgins interviewing  Nick Pelletier, senior consultant with Mandiant and Arthur Tisi, co-founder and CEO at The Praescripto Group LLC, and former CIO for Natural Markets Food Group. To register and save the date, click here.

 
Dr.T
Dr.T,
User Rank: Ninja
11/17/2014 | 9:39:45 AM
Re: Alarming
There can always be end to end encryption to reduce the risk of data being compromised. There is no real need to keep data on the POS unencrypted, easy to solve but it will cost more of course.
Dr.T
Dr.T,
User Rank: Ninja
11/17/2014 | 9:37:03 AM
Re: Cyber Security World Conference 2014
I will most likely miss this but hope be able to follow it online. We now know bad guys are winning based on the recent trends, good guys need to come together and address the issues for sure.
Dr.T
Dr.T,
User Rank: Ninja
11/17/2014 | 9:34:17 AM
POS terminals
It looks like we need to increase intelligence and security on POS terminals, they seem to be proven the weakest link on Target and Home Depot attacks. Maybe in the light of Internet of Things we will have better controlled and managed POS devices.
RyanSepe
RyanSepe,
User Rank: Ninja
11/12/2014 | 7:43:13 AM
Alarming
What a scary notion to ponder before the holiday season where credit cards will be swiped an incredible amount of times. It seems that with the evolution of malware in regards to POS that encryption of the POS points is no longer a strong means of securing customer data since much of the malware is sitting on the boxes themselves according to this article. This means that to perform their job, the machines will eventually have to decrypt the data from the cards and I would believe this would be done on the same system. With this being the case, what are some means of ensuring customer data security, other than persistent scans to detect malware on  daily basis?
KennethW444
KennethW444,
User Rank: Apprentice
11/12/2014 | 1:57:47 AM
Cyber Security World Conference 2014

Along these lines, cyber security experts will be in attendance at Golden Networking's Cyber Security World Conference 2014, November 21, where renowned information security authorities will bring their latest thinking to hundreds of senior executives focused on protecting today's enterprises and government data assets. This conference is organized by Golden Networking.



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