Dark Reading is part of the Informa Tech Division of Informa PLC

This site is operated by a business or businesses owned by Informa PLC and all copyright resides with them.Informa PLC's registered office is 5 Howick Place, London SW1P 1WG. Registered in England and Wales. Number 8860726.

Comments
Stuxnet 'Patient Zero' Attack Targets Revealed
Newest First  |  Oldest First  |  Threaded View
RetiredUser
50%
50%
RetiredUser,
User Rank: Ninja
11/13/2014 | 6:51:44 PM
Insider Espionage?
If we are to take the information at face value, we need to think about how worms like Stuxnet are implemented.  If the computer at Foolad Technic Engineering Company was infected just hours after the worm's creation, then yes, the idea of infection via USB isn't as likely, unless the worm was either written there onsite (which could have even been done on the first computer infected) or it was downloaded by an insider who was in communication with the Stuxnet authors and was waiting for it to be completed before downloading it.  There is great significance in the short time frame between creation of Stuxnet and infection of the first computer.  We could be looking at insider espionage, and investigation of who was working at Foolad during that timeframe will likely lead to identification of the original perpetrators.  I'm no political scientist, but after reading all the original articles linked from the Wikipedia page on Stuxnet, and newer ones since, one wonders if we aren't actually looking at self-sabotage (whether or not the actual writers of the code were based in Iran – it could have been made to order).  

I recall reading that several facts of the attack would make self-sabotage out of the question, the argument being that if the Iranians at the plants were going to sabotage themselves, they wouldn't create such a complex worm to do it.  Expense, intelligence involved, sheer hours to develop the work and the fact all the exploits it used were exposed and can't necessarily be used again; all point to external players.  Additionally, highly-guarded authentic private keys from two large companies were compromised and used to digitally-sign the worm, making the software "authentic", and the fact that four (at least) zero-day exploits were used to spread this worm - hardcore.  But I'd argue that we've seen more sophistication in the Middle East that we'd previously given credit for, even if it was gained through working with outsiders.  Remember, these plants are staffed with sharp engineers and whatever the reason for it, there could easily have been a motive for someone in one of the organizations listed, Foolad standing out, to kick off Stuxnet.         
Marilyn Cohodas
50%
50%
Marilyn Cohodas,
User Rank: Strategist
11/12/2014 | 8:47:01 AM
Re: stuxnet
Yes, I definately want to put the book on my reading list...
Bprince
50%
50%
Bprince,
User Rank: Ninja
11/12/2014 | 8:17:01 AM
stuxnet
The malware was a game changer in so many ways. Looking forward to reading this when I get a chance.
RyanSepe
50%
50%
RyanSepe,
User Rank: Ninja
11/12/2014 | 7:46:39 AM
Re: Stuxnet
Agreed, it truly is fascinating and terrifying at the same time. Has this attack evolved since its original inception or has it remained pretty close to a constant?
Thomas Claburn
50%
50%
Thomas Claburn,
User Rank: Ninja
11/11/2014 | 5:25:18 PM
Stuxnet
I find the Stuxnet endlessly fascinating. I look forward to reading Kim Zetter's account.


Edge-DRsplash-10-edge-articles
I Smell a RAT! New Cybersecurity Threats for the Crypto Industry
David Trepp, Partner, IT Assurance with accounting and advisory firm BPM LLP,  7/9/2021
News
Attacks on Kaseya Servers Led to Ransomware in Less Than 2 Hours
Robert Lemos, Contributing Writer,  7/7/2021
Commentary
It's in the Game (but It Shouldn't Be)
Tal Memran, Cybersecurity Expert, CYE,  7/9/2021
Register for Dark Reading Newsletters
White Papers
Video
Cartoon
Current Issue
The State of Cybersecurity Incident Response
In this report learn how enterprises are building their incident response teams and processes, how they research potential compromises, how they respond to new breaches, and what tools and processes they use to remediate problems and improve their cyber defenses for the future.
Flash Poll
Twitter Feed
Dark Reading - Bug Report
Bug Report
Enterprise Vulnerabilities
From DHS/US-CERT's National Vulnerability Database
CVE-2021-21866
PUBLISHED: 2021-08-02
A unsafe deserialization vulnerability exists in the ObjectManager.plugin ProfileInformation.ProfileData functionality of CODESYS GmbH CODESYS Development System 3.5.16 and 3.5.17. A specially crafted file can lead to arbitrary command execution. An attacker can provide a malicious file to trigger t...
CVE-2021-27499
PUBLISHED: 2021-08-02
Ypsomed mylife Cloud, mylife Mobile Application, Ypsomed mylife Cloud: All versions prior to 1.7.2, Ypsomed mylife App: All versions prior to 1.7.5,The application layer encryption of the communication protocol between the Ypsomed mylife App and mylife Cloud uses non-random IVs, which allows man-in-...
CVE-2021-27503
PUBLISHED: 2021-08-02
Ypsomed mylife Cloud, mylife Mobile Application, Ypsomed mylife Cloud: All versions prior to 1.7.2, Ypsomed mylife App: All versions prior to 1.7.5,The application encrypts on the application layer of the communication protocol between the Ypsomed mylife App and mylife Cloud credentials based on har...
CVE-2021-27943
PUBLISHED: 2021-08-02
The pairing procedure used by the Vizio P65-F1 6.0.31.4-2 and E50x-E1 10.0.31.4-2 Smart TVs and mobile application is vulnerable to a brute-force attack (against only 10000 possibilities), allowing a threat actor to forcefully pair the device, leading to remote control of the TV settings and configu...
CVE-2021-29979
PUBLISHED: 2021-08-02
Hubs Cloud allows users to download shared content, specifically HTML and JS, which could allow javascript execution in the Hub Cloud instance’s primary hosting domain.*. This vulnerability affects Hubs Cloud < mozillareality/reticulum/1.0.1/20210618012634.