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Breach Fatigue Sets In With Consumers
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RichardB055
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RichardB055,
User Rank: Apprentice
11/5/2014 | 1:37:56 PM
It's Really Breach Resignation
I believe that Ponemon and RSA have ignored their own observations and mischaracterized the attitude of consumers. The article states that "consumers really do little to alter their shopping behavior following breaches at their favorite stores" but also that "consumers still have strong opinions about how companies should protect their information and how they should respond to breaches."

This is not "breach fatigue" but rather "breach resignation." What can a consumer do realistically in order to counter the risk of a breach? They could no longer shop at a store that has suffered a breach, which many consumers including myself have done. Of course, this assumes that the stores publicly admit to having been breached and also assumes that consumers have an alternative place to shop. Consumers can also stop using credit cards and carry around large wads of cash with which to make their purchases. I've done that, too; but that poses a different type of security risk. Or, I suppose, consumers can bring a security team with them to conduct a security audit of the store and all of its suppliers whenever they want to buy a roll of toilet paper.

In fact, if a consumer really needs something and needs to use a credit card, they are at the mercy of the store with regard to protection from a breach. With an ever increasing number of stores suffering breaches, consumers have no practical alternative but to resign themselves that they are taking a risk by shopping there.
Whoopty
50%
50%
Whoopty,
User Rank: Ninja
11/5/2014 | 11:34:57 AM
Difficult to visualise
I think a lot of the problems with this stem from the fact that the consumers can't see the problem and can't see the reaction from the company. Because it's all digital, it's hard to imagine it being real. 

If a store gets robbed at gunpoint, you might see an armed guard show up, or a better alarm system and security doors in place, but with a hack or data breach, it seems like business as usual for the consumers. So everything must be ok, right?
aws0513
100%
0%
aws0513,
User Rank: Ninja
11/4/2014 | 2:52:32 PM
Decisions are often local
The hard fact about the survey is that it cannot eliminate the human need for services or products when taking distance into consideration.

Example: If a person has reasonable access to only one hardware store, that person is going to use that hardware store.  The person may decide to stop using their payment card if a bank or ATM is conveniently located where they can get cash before going to the hardward store.  But if that is not the case, or they are in a pinch to get a certain product, they may conduct their own on-th-spot "risk assessment" and accept the risks involved with conducting an electronic purchase with the store.
I know some people would claim that there are always other stores or means to purchase services or products.  But that is not a realistic claim. 
Many parts of the world have a limited number of vendors that are nearby where they live and/or work.  If one needs to buy lumber, you could try to buy it online, but delivery options may be limited if there are no distribution points nearby.  BTW...  if you buy lumber, would you really trust the delivery guys to bring the quality lumber you expect?

I guess what I am trying to say is that reliance on customer actions to change commercial security practices is very likely a false expectation.

 


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