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White Hat Hackers Fight For Legal Reform
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Marilyn Cohodas
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Marilyn Cohodas,
User Rank: Strategist
10/22/2014 | 8:59:14 AM
Re: Long-term conversation with legislators & regulators
I can't argue with the fact that this is a critically important national conversation to have. Probably an international conversation...  Have to applaud the white-hatters for beating the drums about it.
Marilyn Cohodas
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Marilyn Cohodas,
User Rank: Strategist
10/22/2014 | 8:59:09 AM
Re: Long-term conversation with legislators & regulators
I can't argue with the fact that this is a critically important national conversation to have. Probably an international conversation...  Have to applaud the white-hatters for beating the drums about it.
Kelly Jackson Higgins
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Kelly Jackson Higgins,
User Rank: Strategist
10/22/2014 | 8:54:48 AM
Re: Long-term conversation with legislators & regulators
My first question about this initiative was "This Congress? Are you kidding me?" But it's really more about keeping the conversation going, educating these industries that have no clue about security research, and hopefully getting consumers more information about the products they are buying and the safety implications of vulnerable software in their cars, etc. I like Billy Rios' perspective about the importance of researchers working with the corresponding fed agencies like DHS and FDA where applicable.
Marilyn Cohodas
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Marilyn Cohodas,
User Rank: Strategist
10/22/2014 | 7:53:47 AM
Long-term conversation with legislators & regulators
Sadly, given the gridlock in Washington, it's hard to imagine a thoughtful conversation about reforming giving white hat hackers the freedome to do their work and ensure the safety of the IoT. That, and the anti-regulatory lobbyists who work for the product manufacturers.
No SOPA
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No SOPA,
User Rank: Ninja
10/21/2014 | 7:01:59 PM
White Hat Police Academy
I've heard it suggested before when legal types were part of this conversation that potentially white hat needs to fall under law enforcement, or similar agencies.  In other words, if you want to work in the field of computer security and do penetration testing and combative hacking, you'll be protected but under the umbrella of the LAPD or FBI, for example.  Amusing, considering some of the more talented cyber security specialists out there are kids.  Of course, being associated with such organizations should provide that extra amount of protection white hatters are calling for, right?  Well, maybe not.  How many fully justified shootings have we seen ruin the career of both peace and police officers?  And, with all the political and economic pressure applied daily to these agencies, who can say when a scapegoat is needed when that really bad exploit is revealed that these agencies can't have anyone else know about?  

Another bill, then?  Well, search away on the Library of Congress website under Bills and Resolutions.  There are plenty of stalled bills out there with keywords like "penetration" "cybersecurity" "hacker" and so forth; many intending to redefine the ecosystem and what happens in it.  But the keyword here is "stalled".  Hell could freeze over before we get the protection and standards being asked for.  What, then?  Well, the industry could pull together and up the game; improve technology and keep some of that tech under wraps, as best it can.  White hatters can start thinking a little more gray, even black, and start covering tracks a little better; write less papers, and deliver exploits anonymously.

Ultimately, this is going to be a long battle.  The force and tactics needed for white hatters to do good work and beat cyber criminals at their own game might always be on the gray side of legal, no matter how laws are adjusted.  And once we start adjusting those laws, whose to say if the black hatters don't just benefit a little themselves from it...

 

 


  


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