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In Plain Sight: How Cyber Criminals Exfiltrate Data Via Video
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cvrcak
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cvrcak,
User Rank: Apprentice
10/22/2014 | 10:52:49 AM
Re: a legitimate reason to upload?
Really, pretty much every video site? Wow. I'd love to see a report of reserach or study that shows the actual percentage p can you post the link or point in the right direction? This is incredibly interesting as they must be really good in determining that the content is indeed hidden or is malware. I am very curious to understand how would an information, like the stolen data in the article, packed in smaller chunks of data and possibly processed further, be with certanty detected as an unallowed hidden content packed into a video file, and all of that on pretty much every video site. Wow, again.
K_Narayan
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K_Narayan,
User Rank: Author
10/21/2014 | 10:24:54 PM
Re: How did they get in?

Robert, all I can say about the way they got in is that their access also went undetected, but that could be an entirely separate article! 

K_Narayan
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K_Narayan,
User Rank: Author
10/21/2014 | 10:22:20 PM
Re: a legitimate reason to upload?

I think what's needed in the industry, and you've touched on it Ulf, is a "read only" mode for cloud providers such that a user can login and download data but cannot upload data to that same service. It's just not possible politically in many organizations to block access outright to many of these services.

K_Narayan
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K_Narayan,
User Rank: Author
10/21/2014 | 10:20:40 PM
Re: Take a data centric approach to security

Absolutely, companies are increasingly discovering new malware variants based on unusual access patterns, rather than traditional AV. As an example, a company found 100,000 tweets coming from one machine in a day. That PC was infected and exfiltrating data 140 characters at a time to a private Twitter account. 

eltorito
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eltorito,
User Rank: Apprentice
10/21/2014 | 7:11:14 PM
Re: a legitimate reason to upload?
Well, the post is cooked up nonsense.  Pretty much every video site scans uploaded videos for hidden content and malware before acceptance.  

 
prospecttoreza
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prospecttoreza,
User Rank: Strategist
10/20/2014 | 9:21:39 AM
a legitimate reason to upload?
"Marketing departments use sites like YouTube and Vimeo to promote the company, while other sites have training videos employees need to be productive." It seems that only marketing dept would be in business of uploading vidoes. All others, will only download.
Dr.T
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Dr.T,
User Rank: Ninja
10/19/2014 | 1:34:44 PM
Re: How did they get in?
Lack of layers in security measures and most likely lack of encrypting data at rest. It should not be easier to go further in the layers, is should get harder actually and that means IDS/IPS, secure servers and then encryption in the data at rest.
Dr.T
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Dr.T,
User Rank: Ninja
10/19/2014 | 1:28:50 PM
Re: Take a data centric approach to security
I agree mainly. It is really strange that a few recent attacks is because of lack of simple measures such as strong passwords and sharing admin privileges. A simple layered security measure would easily prevent from those attacks.
Dr.T
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Dr.T,
User Rank: Ninja
10/19/2014 | 1:24:28 PM
Photos and videos not yours in cloud
I am a little bias when I hear breach to videos and photos and that being a big issue. I do not know why would anybody take a picture or make a video that can not be shared and then share it with the cloud. Solution is simple, stop taking pictures or making videos you can not share. Or just do not make a big deal out of it when it is compromised and shared with others.
Ulf Mattsson
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Ulf Mattsson,
User Rank: Moderator
10/18/2014 | 8:00:57 AM
Take a data centric approach to security
I agree that "attackers are investing in sophisticated measures that let them fly beneath the radar of conventional security."

I'm concerned that major recent breaches involved new forms of malware that may be undetectable by current antivirus systems. Malware tries to hide from its victims. Sophisticated malware can be difficult to detect and may even be signed by trusted (stolen) certificates. Signed malware, which poses as approved legitimate software, continues to set record growth.

Even if the malware is detected it could be hard to notice in the noise from state of the art malware detection systems. McAfee Labs researchers have analyzed the threats and seen a steady growth in malware.

I think it is time to take a data centric approach to security. We should analyze data access patterns, but even more importantly, secure the sensitive data itself with modern data security approaches. Recent studies reported that modern data tokenization can cut security incidents by 50 %. 

Ulf Mattsson, CTO Protegrity
Page 1 / 2   >   >>


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