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'Hurricane Panda' Cyberspies Used Windows Zero-Day For Months
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RyanSepe
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RyanSepe,
User Rank: Ninja
10/16/2014 | 9:34:40 AM
Escalation of RAT's and Elevation
What can be attributed to the recent rise in RAT's? It seems that many of the vulnerabilities that have been discovered recently whether it be Linux or Windows allow for the malicious intender to elevate privileges and backdoor in. Is this due to an overlooked flaw in the coding or is this because some level dictates that this ability is required to run certain designed functionalities?
Robert McDougal
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Robert McDougal,
User Rank: Ninja
10/17/2014 | 3:20:23 PM
What were they after?
"After the attackers were initially stopped, they continued to attempt to regain access on a daily basis."

To me, this is the most striking comment in the article.  Why was this target so important?  Is it just a case of trying to regain a foot hold or were they after something important?
Robert McDougal
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50%
Robert McDougal,
User Rank: Ninja
10/17/2014 | 3:24:43 PM
Re: Escalation of RAT's and Elevation
I personally don't believe it is a coding flaw but the nature of the beast, in regards to operating systems.  There are certain functions that happen on an OS that require SYSTEM or ROOT access in order to function.  To a normal user these processes or daemons function happily in the background.  To an attacker they are the express ticket to the penthouse if they can just catch a ride.

Unless we completely overhaul the modern operating system from the ground up, these types of exploits are here to stay.  Even if we did try to start over from scratch I am not confident we could completely correct this problem.


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