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Russian Hackers Made $2.5B Over The Last 12 Months
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AnonymousMan
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AnonymousMan,
User Rank: Moderator
10/15/2014 | 7:36:47 PM
2.5 billion?
"Rescator made roughly $1 million by selling over 150,000 cards to SWIPED, one of the largest online trading platforms; SWIPED itself made $6 million in one year."

http://krebsonsecurity.com/wp-content/uploads/2014/10/SWIPED-report-KREBSONSEC-1.pdf

I see in the report where SWIPED made $6 million SINCE 2011....but not in one year.  Do you have a different report and if so, can you provide the link?

Also according to Krebs, who references the same report, only 109,094 of the Target cards provided by Rescator were actually "good".  That's about 2%. 

How do we get from 109k cards out of 5m being "usable" to 2.5B being made?  Again, is there a more complete report that provides these details?
AnonymousMan
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50%
AnonymousMan,
User Rank: Moderator
10/15/2014 | 7:37:01 PM
2.5 billion?
"Rescator made roughly $1 million by selling over 150,000 cards to SWIPED, one of the largest online trading platforms; SWIPED itself made $6 million in one year."

http://krebsonsecurity.com/wp-content/uploads/2014/10/SWIPED-report-KREBSONSEC-1.pdf

I see in the report where SWIPED made $6 million SINCE 2011....but not in one year.  Do you have a different report and if so, can you provide the link?

Also according to Krebs, who references the same report, only 109,094 of the Target cards provided by Rescator were actually "good".  That's about 2%. 

How do we get from 109k cards out of 5m being "usable" to 2.5B being made?  Again, is there a more complete report that provides these details?
Broadway0474
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Broadway0474,
User Rank: Apprentice
10/15/2014 | 10:15:12 PM
Re: 2.5 billion?
@AnonymousMan, you seem to have read through the report pretty thoroughly. Does it go into details of how the authors collected their information ... more specifically, their sources? I would think some of this information would be classified by intel services, or dangerous to come by, a la investigating the arms industry.
Whoopty
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Whoopty,
User Rank: Ninja
10/16/2014 | 8:11:13 AM
That's a lot
$2.5 billion is starting to get to the point where you wonder if the state might be getting involved. We've already seen some of the most rogue hacking elements in China come from practically autonomous military units. Perhaps the Russian government is padding its coffers with a bit of illicit hacking? 
Marilyn Cohodas
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Marilyn Cohodas,
User Rank: Strategist
10/16/2014 | 9:17:40 AM
Enforcement irony?
Isn't it ironic that in POS attacks "no one has been prosecuted so far..... therefore there is no reason for a decline, only growth." But the biggest successes (reduction of theft from legal entities) were where there were effective investigations. Isn't that kind of obvious? Or am I missing something? 
prospecttoreza
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prospecttoreza,
User Rank: Strategist
10/16/2014 | 9:31:51 AM
this number was not reported on the tax return, so were does it come from?
So Target lost around 50M cards, Home deport another 50M. Let's double this number to cover other breaches. 200M. Now, kids, let's multiply 200M by $10 per card - and we are getting a wooping $2Billion. But that is assuming that all of them are sold - at that specific price! Look at all other numbers here depicting profit from selling data to spammers and so on. These numbers have 3 meaningful digits which implies 0.1% accuracy! This is all bogus numbers that come from a mere action of multiplication.
RyanSepe
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RyanSepe,
User Rank: Ninja
10/16/2014 | 9:40:11 AM
Re: Enforcement irony?
You bring up a good point Marilyn. How come there have been no substantial repercussions for these attacks? Basically illuminating the idea that if the stove never burned you, you would keep touching it proverb. Especially if it had a high yield like credit data theft.

From my perspective I would have to think it would be difficult to prosecute on an international level. Not being too familiar with other countries cyber crime laws and punishments. But in certain countries these may not apply. Is there a global authoritative level for issues such as these?
AnonymousMan
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AnonymousMan,
User Rank: Moderator
10/16/2014 | 10:48:38 AM
Re: That's a lot
It is a lot, but since it's pretty much a made up number AFAICT...why not say $2.5T?  Then we could really get some popular support in the US for the Govt to intervene like we all know they want to.
Dr.T
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100%
Dr.T,
User Rank: Ninja
10/16/2014 | 6:32:44 PM
Time for Apple Pay?
Maybe it is time for ApplePay now. Apple releasing iOS8.1 on Monday which will support ApplePay, that may a way out with this complexity.
Dr.T
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50%
Dr.T,
User Rank: Ninja
10/16/2014 | 6:35:08 PM
Re: That's a lot
Numbers are more likely estimates but that does not change the fact that there is a market on stolen credit cards. We need to change overall system to avoid utilization of current credit cards and numbers.
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