Dark Reading is part of the Informa Tech Division of Informa PLC

This site is operated by a business or businesses owned by Informa PLC and all copyright resides with them.Informa PLC's registered office is 5 Howick Place, London SW1P 1WG. Registered in England and Wales. Number 8860726.

Comments
In AppSec, Fast Is Everything
Threaded  |  Newest First  |  Oldest First
Angelfuego
Angelfuego,
User Rank: Apprentice
10/13/2014 | 12:06:31 PM
Fast Trumps It All
So it sounds like AppSec is a viable tool that could prevent security defects from even happening in the first place. It also seems cost effective in the long run. The fact that app security defects increases the longer they are permitted to stay in the software baseline makes total sense, but it is something I never really thought about. Thank you for the information. I did not hear about AppSec prior to reading your article. You gave me something to think about.
planetlevel
planetlevel,
User Rank: Author
10/20/2014 | 3:29:06 PM
Re: Fast Trumps It All
It's easy to think that Agile/DevOps are going to result in worse application security, because short release cycles don't allow for full application security reviews to occur.  But this thinking is wrongheaded for two reasons.

First, there's nothing you can do about it.  High speed software development is happening and it's very unlikely that security can make it stop (not that you'd want to).  If you try you will make yourself extremely unpopular and get marginalized. Ultimately, you'll end up hurting security by getting yourself cut out of the loop.

Second, these movements are a *massive* opportunity to do security better. These efforts are establishing the infrastructure necessary to do security at high-speed.  Security folks just need to learn about the tools being used for software development -- tools like Jenkins, Sonar, JIRA, Puppet, and others are easy to leverage to do realtime application security at scale.

Try the free Contrast for Eclipse with your Java developers, and see what a huge difference *fast* can make.  It really does change everything.

--Jeff
RyanSepe
RyanSepe,
User Rank: Ninja
10/13/2014 | 12:32:25 PM
SCRUM Tactics and Ingrained Security
It is always best to have security in mind at the beginning stages of development. By ingraining app security at each step you will have a product that is honed not only towards user features but also provides the most secure implementation at rollout.

Its also important to think of this from a Scrum methodology standpoint. If app development is broken into sprints each level of the application will have an individual layer of security. A traditional approach will definitely leave certain holes within the product.
Marilyn Cohodas
Marilyn Cohodas,
User Rank: Strategist
10/13/2014 | 3:33:30 PM
Re: SCRUM Tactics and Ingrained Security
Ryan, sounds like you are following similar tactics where you work. 
Robert McDougal
Robert McDougal,
User Rank: Ninja
10/17/2014 | 11:17:26 AM
Re: SCRUM Tactics and Ingrained Security
@RyanSepe The problem I have ran into when dealing with SCRUM and Agile programming is that the execs expect to receive quicker 'releases' by using the Agile methodolgy.  It has been a difficult road to get them to understand that security still must play a part in each sprint.  Have you seen this in your organization as well?


Edge-DRsplash-10-edge-articles
I Smell a RAT! New Cybersecurity Threats for the Crypto Industry
David Trepp, Partner, IT Assurance with accounting and advisory firm BPM LLP,  7/9/2021
News
Attacks on Kaseya Servers Led to Ransomware in Less Than 2 Hours
Robert Lemos, Contributing Writer,  7/7/2021
Commentary
It's in the Game (but It Shouldn't Be)
Tal Memran, Cybersecurity Expert, CYE,  7/9/2021
Register for Dark Reading Newsletters
White Papers
Video
Cartoon
Current Issue
Black Hat USA 2022 Attendee Report
Black Hat attendees are not sleeping well. Between concerns about attacks against cloud services, ransomware, and the growing risks to the global supply chain, these security pros have a lot to be worried about. Read our 2022 report to hear what they're concerned about now.
Flash Poll
Twitter Feed
Dark Reading - Bug Report
Bug Report
Enterprise Vulnerabilities
From DHS/US-CERT's National Vulnerability Database
CVE-2017-2597
PUBLISHED: 2022-08-08
** REJECT ** DO NOT USE THIS CANDIDATE NUMBER. ConsultIDs: none. Reason: This candidate was in a CNA pool that was not assigned to any issues during 2017. Notes: none.
CVE-2017-2631
PUBLISHED: 2022-08-08
** REJECT ** DO NOT USE THIS CANDIDATE NUMBER. ConsultIDs: none. Reason: This candidate was in a CNA pool that was not assigned to any issues during 2017. Notes: none.
CVE-2017-2657
PUBLISHED: 2022-08-08
** REJECT ** DO NOT USE THIS CANDIDATE NUMBER. ConsultIDs: none. Reason: This candidate was in a CNA pool that was not assigned to any issues during 2017. Notes: none.
CVE-2017-7527
PUBLISHED: 2022-08-08
** REJECT ** DO NOT USE THIS CANDIDATE NUMBER. ConsultIDs: none. Reason: This candidate was in a CNA pool that was not assigned to any issues during 2017. Notes: none.
CVE-2021-41615
PUBLISHED: 2022-08-08
websda.c in GoAhead WebServer 2.1.8 has insufficient nonce entropy because the nonce calculation relies on the hardcoded onceuponatimeinparadise value, which does not follow the secret-data guideline for HTTP Digest Access Authentication in RFC 7616 section 3.3 (or RFC 2617 section 3.2.1). NOTE: 2.1...