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Software Assurance: Time to Raise the Bar on Static Analysis
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KevGreene_Cyber
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KevGreene_Cyber,
User Rank: Author
10/7/2014 | 10:09:36 AM
Re: complementary sweet spots
@Sara -- from my experience organizations typically use one tool -- the concept of best of breed has died and people have bought into the concept of UTM (Unified Threat Management).  We've seen this on the network side of the shop with Cisco, Juniper, and Fortinet... The same has happened with the AppSec/SwA tools -- all in one.  But that locks organizations into that proprietary solution.  The feedback I got from organizations is that it takes too much time to triage mutiple reports from tools -- or it takes resources to bring in a new tool.  So that becomes a barrier to introducing additional tools into the workflow.  The SWAMP eliminates that barrier and enable the developer to focus on those weaknesses that matters the most. The bigger shops or more mature organizations tend to use multiple tools, but have to glue results from various tools.  I'm sharing witht the community, we have solved that problem and are able to leverage the context from various tools to help dive deeper into weaknesses in code. 
Sara Peters
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Sara Peters,
User Rank: Author
10/6/2014 | 4:10:28 PM
complementary sweet spots
As you mention, Kevin, it's better to use multiple tools, instead of just one, because different tools excel at different things. In your experience, do most organizations and developers combine tools like this, or do they too often pick just one?
Marilyn Cohodas
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Marilyn Cohodas,
User Rank: Strategist
10/2/2014 | 1:43:31 PM
Re: Tool Compilation
Thanks, Kevin. We'll be looking forward to you sharing the insight you get from SWAMP as the project evolves. 
KevGreene_Cyber
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KevGreene_Cyber,
User Rank: Author
10/1/2014 | 12:09:19 PM
Re: Tool Compilation
@Marilyn -- we have not determined that yet.  However, there is some data to suggest which tools may work well together depending on language and the program structure of code.  For open-source tools, we can definitely share some insight on that, but commercial tools you are restricted from sharing information based on the EULA --

The SWAMP opened in Feb of 2014, and we are stil buidling the analytics around this notion.  
Marilyn Cohodas
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50%
Marilyn Cohodas,
User Rank: Strategist
10/1/2014 | 8:59:37 AM
Re: Tool Compilation
Following on Ryan's comment, Kevin: Have you determined through SWAMP (thus far) what is the most popular or most effective tool combo for SA? 
RyanSepe
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RyanSepe,
User Rank: Ninja
9/30/2014 | 2:46:24 PM
Re: Tool Compilation
I'll take a look thanks! Just a quick question, do you specialize in one genre of tool or do you group tools by genres to subscribe to more users? (NetSec tools, InfoSec tools, etc)
KevGreene_Cyber
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KevGreene_Cyber,
User Rank: Author
9/30/2014 | 1:16:03 PM
Re: Tool Compilation
@Ryan... Thanks for your comment.  CodeDx bundles open-source tools and allow you to bring in others as well (commerical and open-source) in one GUI.  The goal is to provide a cost-effective solution to help formalize aspects of software assurance in organizations.  You should give it a eval and let us know what you think.  Also, create an account in SWAMP let us know what you think.  
RyanSepe
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50%
RyanSepe,
User Rank: Ninja
9/30/2014 | 1:08:47 PM
Tool Compilation
Good article. It definitely seems to be more often than not the case that a tool alone yields not as verbose data results as tools used in correlation. It takes time and effort to find the precise tools needed and each endeavor requires different data so its hard to foresee what tools are needed.

For tools that are open source, why not have them combined in a GUI or command line fashion in one distribution. Allow functionality to add upon those packages for data correlation and your analysis efficiency should increase ten fold. 


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