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When Layers On Layers Of Security Equals LOL Security
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RyanSepe
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RyanSepe,
User Rank: Ninja
9/29/2014 | 11:42:04 AM
Re: Solution?
I think a correlation of all of those things is a step in the right direction. Unfortunately, to your last comment involving the enforcement of certain protections, many corporations don't start implementing more stringent security capabilities until their burnt so to speak. However, reactive this may be, this is the case with many of the organzations involved in recent breaches.

As Information Security professionals, we need to make it one of the highest priorities to display value in proactive management instead of reactive management. Only then will we even be close to staying ahead of the game.
IMjustinkern
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IMjustinkern,
User Rank: Strategist
9/29/2014 | 11:21:27 AM
Solution?
So, does infosec just need better layers? Updated understanding and training of security practices? Or (ugh) compliance/regulation to enforce certain protections?
Otherwise, I'm missing the alternative or secondary path to protect enterprise data.
RyanSepe
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RyanSepe,
User Rank: Ninja
9/29/2014 | 9:26:34 AM
Layered Approach
The last snippet sounds like honeypot functionality which I am not entirely certain is the best approach. There are many interesting points made in this article.

I saw McAfee has a type of deterrant program to protect against rootkit if all your systems are an i5 or higher. Which I think in this article would be deemed pretty useful. It seems that in the layered approach consistency is the downfall. I think the point here is evolution. Antivirus and other security layers need to evolve with threats similar to how an IPS uses anomalies to determine if new traffic should be blocked or not. Older technologies that ues the same logic tend to be exploited specifically because they have been out for such a long time and can be tested against. Not to say that AV has not changed but in its core architecture, it models very closely in its procedures to older AV's.

I know this article provides a different perpsective to Defense in Depth but how does the dark reading community feel about UTM? Does this fall into the layered approach due to its all in one housing or does incorporating layers into a cohesive process alleviate some of the woes provided in layered security?


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