Dark Reading is part of the Informa Tech Division of Informa PLC

This site is operated by a business or businesses owned by Informa PLC and all copyright resides with them.Informa PLC's registered office is 5 Howick Place, London SW1P 1WG. Registered in England and Wales. Number 8860726.

Comments
DR Radio: A Grown-Up Conversation About Passwords
Newest First  |  Oldest First  |  Threaded View
HAnatomi
50%
50%
HAnatomi,
User Rank: Apprentice
9/19/2014 | 8:51:12 PM
Re: Not only texts but also images
I wonderif you will have a look at the document posted by a Japanese company Mnemonic Security at

 " mneme.blog.eonet.jp/default/files/outline_of_mnemonic_security.pdf "  Add h t t p / /

and a blogsite

 " mnemonicguard.blogspot.jp/ " Add h t t p / /

 that I am following.
Marilyn Cohodas
50%
50%
Marilyn Cohodas,
User Rank: Strategist
9/19/2014 | 9:51:26 AM
Re: Not only texts but also images
HAnatomi -- What would be an example of a known versus unkown image? and how would that work as an authentication factor?
HAnatomi
50%
50%
HAnatomi,
User Rank: Apprentice
9/19/2014 | 3:19:29 AM
Re: Not only texts but also images
It is perhaps impossible for anyone to remember 100 UNKNOWN images afresh.  The images to be used for passwords should be the KNOWN images of our episodic/autobiographic images, which are said to be the least vulerable to the cognitive phenomenon named "interference of memory".

 
Marilyn Cohodas
50%
50%
Marilyn Cohodas,
User Rank: Strategist
9/18/2014 | 9:58:50 AM
Re: Not only texts but also images
That's intereting about images. But is the human brain capable of remembering 100 images, one unique authenticator for each app or web site? Or won't that be necessary with images?
HAnatomi
50%
50%
HAnatomi,
User Rank: Apprentice
9/18/2014 | 1:31:34 AM
Not only texts but also images
At the root of the password problem is the cognitive phenomena called "interference of memory", by which we cannot firmly remember more than 5 text passwords on average.  What worries us is not the password, but the textual password.  The textual memory is only a small part of what we remember.  We could think of making use of the larger part of our memory that is less subject to interference of memory.  More attention could be paid to the efforts of expanding the password system to include images, particularly KNOWN images, as well as conventional texts.

 

Most of the humans are thousands times better at dealing with image memories than text memories. The former dates back to hundreds of millions of years ago while the latter's history is less than a fraction of it.I wonder what merits we have in confining ourselves in the narrow corridor of text memories when CPUs are fast enough, bandwidth broad enough, memory storage cheap enough, and cameras built in mobile devices.
Kelly Jackson Higgins
50%
50%
Kelly Jackson Higgins,
User Rank: Strategist
9/17/2014 | 3:15:04 PM
Re: No shortage of opinions on this topic!
Really great interview and discussion with Cormac, Sara. His provocative perspective on passwords really generated some great discussion and debate. And of course, there's no good answer for authentication. =)
Marilyn Cohodas
50%
50%
Marilyn Cohodas,
User Rank: Strategist
9/16/2014 | 3:54:56 PM
No shortage of opinions on this topic!
This should be lively discussion, Sara. Everyone has an opinion on passwords - and we've had our share of them on Dark Reading! Andrey Dulkin of CyberArk Research Labs weighed in in July on "Weak Password Advice From Microsoft" (http://www.darkreading.com/operations/identity-and-access-management/weak-password-advice-from-microsoft/a/d-id/1297592) and today,  Corey Nachreiner, of WatchGuard Technologies, gave a qualified "Defense of Passwords" -- as long as you use them correctly along with something else (http://www.darkreading.com/operations/in-defense-of-passwords/a/d-id/1315719?). 

Let the debate begin! 


COVID-19: Latest Security News & Commentary
Dark Reading Staff 9/21/2020
Cybersecurity Bounces Back, but Talent Still Absent
Simone Petrella, Chief Executive Officer, CyberVista,  9/16/2020
Meet the Computer Scientist Who Helped Push for Paper Ballots
Kelly Jackson Higgins, Executive Editor at Dark Reading,  9/16/2020
Register for Dark Reading Newsletters
White Papers
Video
Cartoon
Latest Comment: Exactly
Current Issue
Special Report: Computing's New Normal
This special report examines how IT security organizations have adapted to the "new normal" of computing and what the long-term effects will be. Read it and get a unique set of perspectives on issues ranging from new threats & vulnerabilities as a result of remote working to how enterprise security strategy will be affected long term.
Flash Poll
How IT Security Organizations are Attacking the Cybersecurity Problem
How IT Security Organizations are Attacking the Cybersecurity Problem
The COVID-19 pandemic turned the world -- and enterprise computing -- on end. Here's a look at how cybersecurity teams are retrenching their defense strategies, rebuilding their teams, and selecting new technologies to stop the oncoming rise of online attacks.
Twitter Feed
Dark Reading - Bug Report
Bug Report
Enterprise Vulnerabilities
From DHS/US-CERT's National Vulnerability Database
CVE-2020-6564
PUBLISHED: 2020-09-21
Inappropriate implementation in permissions in Google Chrome prior to 85.0.4183.83 allowed a remote attacker to spoof the contents of a permission dialog via a crafted HTML page.
CVE-2020-6565
PUBLISHED: 2020-09-21
Inappropriate implementation in Omnibox in Google Chrome on iOS prior to 85.0.4183.83 allowed a remote attacker to spoof the contents of the Omnibox (URL bar) via a crafted HTML page.
CVE-2020-6566
PUBLISHED: 2020-09-21
Insufficient policy enforcement in media in Google Chrome prior to 85.0.4183.83 allowed a remote attacker to leak cross-origin data via a crafted HTML page.
CVE-2020-6567
PUBLISHED: 2020-09-21
Insufficient validation of untrusted input in command line handling in Google Chrome on Windows prior to 85.0.4183.83 allowed a remote attacker to bypass navigation restrictions via a crafted HTML page.
CVE-2020-6568
PUBLISHED: 2020-09-21
Insufficient policy enforcement in intent handling in Google Chrome on Android prior to 85.0.4183.83 allowed a remote attacker to bypass navigation restrictions via a crafted HTML page.