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Home Depot Breach May Not Be Related To BlackPOS, Target
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Sara Peters
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Sara Peters,
User Rank: Author
9/15/2014 | 2:33:42 PM
Re: PoS malware a growing threat
@GonzSTL   All great points. The most professional malware authors are going to build on success (whether it's theirs or someone else's) not reinvent the wheel. But this is, I think, the most important thing you said:  "More importantly, why didn't these breached companies have some mechanism in place that examines data leaving their organizations and prevents data from inappropriately going out?"   I think we're seeing again and again and again that organizations aren't watching what's leaving, which is making it possible for these breaches take place over the span of months. 
SgS125
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SgS125,
User Rank: Ninja
9/12/2014 | 10:26:57 AM
Great write up!
Thanks for providing the technical details on the code.

Always nice to have some in depth reporting, and it is interesting to see the differences so cleanly laid out by someone who has access to the details.

Very much appreciated, great article!
GonzSTL
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GonzSTL,
User Rank: Ninja
9/12/2014 | 9:43:45 AM
Re: PoS malware a growing threat
Agreed, but is it really surprising that there is a potentially new malware strain that is equally nasty? I used to write software and one of my main strategies was to never reinvent the wheel, but instead, improve and optimize it. If I were to create new malware, I would look at the existing ones that have had great success, pick out the particularly good and clever aspects of each one, and combine them all into a new product, optimized and sophisticated enough to hide itself using proven methods. I view this as a natural evolution of malware; the bad guys are quite clever, and surely that is exactly what they are doing. Why is this shocking? In fact, why isn't this anticipated? Why aren't the anti-malware products equipped with this anticipated behavior detecting techniques in their heuristic algorithms? Maybe they are, but apparently not quite up to the challenge, supporting the stigma that the good guys are always playing catch up to the bad guys.

More importantly, why didn't these breached companies have some mechanism in place that examines data leaving their organizations and prevents data from inappropriately going out? Plain text data traversing the network can be easily examined and regulated for controlled content, to prevent sensitive data leakage. Encrypted data with external destinations should be suspicious and therefore carefully monitored and controlled. I am curious - did any of these breached companies even fully implement the SANS 20 Critical Security Controls at the very least, or did they simply put cursory systems in place that allowed them to mark a check in the appropriate compliance checkboxes? One of the biggest pitfalls in security is assuming that compliance means security, and I wonder if any of these companies were guilty of that.
Marilyn Cohodas
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Marilyn Cohodas,
User Rank: Strategist
9/12/2014 | 8:18:15 AM
Getting the facts straight
With the almost daily reporting of retail breaches these days, it's tempting for the news media to jump to quick  conclusion that further analysis doesn't bear out. Thanks for the thoughtful reporting on this story, Sara, and for keeping the record straight at Dark Reading, Sara. 
securityaffairs
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securityaffairs,
User Rank: Ninja
9/11/2014 | 4:57:26 PM
PoS malware a growing threat
PoS malware has characterized the 2013, their evolution is the results of continuous developments offered in the underground market. Exfiltration techniques and evasion methods are making these threats even more complex and hard to analyze.

If the news in the title is confirmed security community will face with a new strain of malware with features similar to BlackPos malware that is equally dangerous.


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