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How To Create A Risk 'Pain Chart'
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RyanSepe
RyanSepe,
User Rank: Ninja
8/29/2014 | 2:38:49 PM
Providing relatable value
This is great! For years now, Information Security has been progressing to the point where we can display extreme value to the business side of the operation. Not that we were irrelevant in the past, but I feel that we are getting the the point where non-security people can easily relate as to why security measures are so important.

In years to come I feel that this exercise will be quite prevalent and most likely already be ingrained in the minds of business owners. Educative repetition and relation analysis is the key.
JeremiahT680
JeremiahT680,
User Rank: Apprentice
9/1/2014 | 12:28:28 PM
Sandboxing data inside an encrypted application layer
If you sandbox each record or entity within and create an interface in your own coding language the perhaps you could create so many layers or barriers to cross that the intrusion would be detected and prevented.
Stratustician
Stratustician,
User Rank: Moderator
9/2/2014 | 9:09:50 AM
Re: Providing relatable value
I agree, I especially love the idea of assigning a risk or impact value to each specifically since as pointed out, some assets have more value than others.  Treating all risks as the same threat level is no longer a way to ensure that you are prioritizing the right areas of your security plan.  It's also a great way, as illustrated in the article, to ask for the funding you really need for each project based on the real risks and costs associated to protect those assets.
Marilyn Cohodas
Marilyn Cohodas,
User Rank: Strategist
9/2/2014 | 9:50:14 AM
Re: Providing relatable value
Concept sounds great to me, but who woud the decisionmakers be in determining risk/pain priorities? Thoughts anyone?  
RyanSepe
RyanSepe,
User Rank: Ninja
9/2/2014 | 2:06:47 PM
Re: Providing relatable value
I would think that everyone on a security team would have the ability to determine what has a higher risk value than others. Its a group effort. However, you need an authoritative head to sign off on these decisions. I would say the person who signs off on corporate security policy would be the authoratative head here. Most likely the CSO/CISO. 

I think a good way to look at this principle is you wouldn't construct a $1000 fence to guard a $10 asset. Realistic safeguards need to be a priority.
GonzSTL
GonzSTL,
User Rank: Ninja
9/3/2014 | 11:40:31 AM
Re: Providing relatable value
This is classic Risk Management, and is nothing new. I believe that the ultimate sign off should lie in the hands of someone responsible for the entire organization, such as the CEO, COO, CRO, etc. As long as the proper personnel are involved in the risk assessment team, the security officer makes recommendations based on a well informed decision process conducted by the team. Mind you, the assumption is that the risk assessment is conducted properly. If the security office is empowered to make the decision, then certainly the officer has the final say, with the implied consent of the CEO through delegation of authority.
JasonSachowski
JasonSachowski,
User Rank: Author
9/3/2014 | 11:50:07 AM
Re: How To Create A Risk 'Pain Chart'
@MarilynCohodas, everything security always comes back to the business it supports which would be no different with determining risk/pain priorities.  A "committee" of decisison makers should be made up of people who can translate the techie-talk into meanful business language and consists of stakeholders throughout the organization (ex. InfoSec, Privacy, Legal, etc), shareholders, and executives.


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