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Feds Investigating Breaches At JPMorgan, Other Banks
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GonzSTL
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GonzSTL,
User Rank: Ninja
8/29/2014 | 4:19:30 PM
Re: "sophistication"
You can buy or download everything technical that you will need to craft an attack from the internet, and the only thing left is a delivery mechanism. Well, you can get that from the internet as well - just shop for botnets for rent. Why reinvent the wheel, right?

I'm not saying that the bad guys are not smart people; I'm just simply stating that attacking an entity is not that difficult these days. The flip side however, is mitigating a risk, which is an entirely different undertaking with complexities that are sometimes difficult to overcome. It really does take a culture change within an organization to better position itself against a threat.
Robert McDougal
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Robert McDougal,
User Rank: Ninja
8/29/2014 | 3:47:53 PM
Re: "sophistication"
I agree with you.  Often the attack isn't very sophisticated but rather the attackers are smart and use simple, slow techniques which often avoid detection.
Kelly Jackson Higgins
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Kelly Jackson Higgins,
User Rank: Strategist
8/29/2014 | 11:05:32 AM
update from Bloomberg today
Just updated my piece with a new report from Bloomberg that says the attack began in June, used multiple 0day exploits, and went undiscovered until mid-August when the bank found signs of a breach. 
Marilyn Cohodas
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Marilyn Cohodas,
User Rank: Strategist
8/29/2014 | 10:50:27 AM
Re: Chase encourages phishing
Kelly did a great job sorting out the facts from the initial media pile-on. Double kudos for that!
JohnRS
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JohnRS,
User Rank: Apprentice
8/29/2014 | 10:38:44 AM
Chase encourages phishing
I have some accounts with Chase.  Recently I realized that the boilerplate at the bottom of many of their messages includes instructions regarding phishing messages which is the OPPOSITE of what you should do.  Here it is, from a block boldly labelled "E-mail Security Information":

If you are concerned about the authenticity of this message, please click here or call the phone number on the back of your credit card. If you would like to learn more about e-mail security or want to report a suspicious e-mail, click here

Yes, Chase is telling you (twice) to click on a link in a suspected phishing message.  Duh!

DarkReadingTim
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DarkReadingTim,
User Rank: Strategist
8/29/2014 | 10:05:32 AM
Re: "sophistication"
I agree with this point, Bob, as well as the one you made in the story about attribution. It's difficult for us as reporters to wrestle with these breaking breach stories, because we are limited by what the victim is willing to tell us. Whether the attack was sophisticated, and where it came from, are sometimes things that even the victim organization doesn't know in the early stages.

I sometimes feel like we would get more value from studying breaches that have been executed, investigated, and remediated than we get from studying yesterday's breach, where so little information is available.
securityaffairs
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securityaffairs,
User Rank: Ninja
8/29/2014 | 2:03:30 AM
Re: "sophistication"
The circumstance is very concerning, it is crucial to understand the extend of the attack in term of compromised systems and impacted users.

Another element to understand is the attack chain of the gang to understand if they are linked to the recent wave of cyber attacks which hit European banks. 

The media reported on an alleged zero-day exploited in US and EU attacks ... anyway law enforcement and numerous forensic companies are already investigating ...

 
Bob Stratton
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50%
Bob Stratton,
User Rank: Apprentice
8/28/2014 | 5:21:31 PM
"sophistication"
I'm not speaking specifically to the JPMC case, because we have yet to see, but I have long been awaiting the day when someone would address the seemingly obligatory "It was a highly sophisticated attack" canard from victim organizations.  In general, it often isn't. I'm still trying to divine what cover people think they're actually gaining when they assert that. 

Kudos to both J. J. Thompson and our author for actually raising that point in any forum. 


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