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Why Are Security Pros Blas About Compliance?
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RyanSepe
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50%
RyanSepe,
User Rank: Ninja
8/28/2014 | 3:19:25 PM
Regulators
I just commented about this in a previous article. As you say in the article, many corporations just strive to be compliant. This is setting the bar very low and definitely doesn't ensure data saftey which has been delineated by the recent breaches. 

What needs to happen is that higher compliance and security measures need to become standards. If this is set as the minimal requirement than organizations will follow shortly behind. Its unfortunate, but unless stringent repercussions are in place. In seems that frivolous corporate America will continue to cut corners.

**Above is a generalized statement. Does not apply to all organizations.
Alison_Diana
100%
0%
Alison_Diana,
User Rank: Moderator
8/28/2014 | 2:28:06 PM
More Details Please
I'd love to know more about who responded to the studies. Focusing as I do on healthcare, many organizations don't have CSOs or CISOs, meaning there's no specific executive responsible for overseeing the overall security realm. That means they don't have a top-level exec partnerhing with chief counsel (inhouse or contract) -- and that means governance and compliance get shunted on to the CEO, COO, or other exec who has a gazillion other things going on. Since compliance involves a whole lot more than technology, it's important that ownership extends to someone who oversees security as a whole, not just tech.
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