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How I Hacked My Home, IoT Style
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DarkReadingTim
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DarkReadingTim,
User Rank: Strategist
8/29/2014 | 9:28:16 AM
Re: Assessment Tools
Curious to know how many of the techniques described here would translate to an enterprise security manager suddenly faced with managing so many non-computer devices? What will be the effects of IoT in the business?
Cybdiver
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Cybdiver,
User Rank: Apprentice
8/29/2014 | 8:19:58 AM
Re: Assessment Tools
Restricting access to the internet does not seem likely except during a test phase.   I notice that even the smallest of storage devices these days shouts out to the net checking to see if it's software is up to date.  Also many newer devices are selling home cloud solutions.

You and I are probably among the few that go to the extent of trying to lock down a network.  Most folks just plug gear in and go with it.  I've even come across that at larger companies.  Their IT staff is overloaded with just keepign the users working and printers full of ink they take a firewall install it with defaults and figure that's good enough.  I'm kinda grateful they do that. 
davidjacoby
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davidjacoby,
User Rank: Author
8/29/2014 | 7:22:57 AM
Re: Assessment Tools
Hola!

Thanks for your comment and i agree that these attacks are not very popular. Thats not the point. Please read my entire article at Securelist and you will understand.

 

http://securelist.com/analysis/publications/66207/iot-how-i-hacked-my-home/
davidjacoby
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davidjacoby,
User Rank: Author
8/29/2014 | 7:20:20 AM
Re: Assessment Tools
Hola Kelly,

Ill paste you the answer i gave to another user here, it applies on your question too:

Just a small note, event that these devices where located on my local network, i could trigger the vulnerabilities remotely by a simple JavaScript. When any "real" device, such as a laptop, visisted my malicious website, the vulnerabilities in the storage device was triggered, and i would access the local area network again.


Once again, i think one of the best options here, is to restrict access to the Internet for the devices.

But to develop my JavaScript i still needed some information about the local area network.
davidjacoby
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davidjacoby,
User Rank: Author
8/29/2014 | 7:18:55 AM
Re: Assessment Tools
Hi Cybdiver,

 

Just a small note, event that these devices where located on my local network, i could trigger the vulnerabilities remotely by a simple JavaScript. When any "real" device, such as a laptop, visisted my malicious website, the vulnerabilities in the storage device was triggered, and i would access the local area network again.


Once again, i think one of the best options here, is to restrict access to the Internet for the devices.
Cybdiver
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Cybdiver,
User Rank: Apprentice
8/28/2014 | 4:22:48 PM
Re: Assessment Tools
I went through the same drama at home, and then went and invested in a firewall appliance.  It cost a few bucks but much more secure than the NAT from a DSL modem or router.  Articals like these are always good reminders to check our networks. 

The sad truth is many manufacturers are so eager to give us online this or that they forget or ignore security concerns to get their products working or just out to market.  I went through this with of all companies Microsoft and an Xbox.  It's quite a gymnastic task getting the right ports open so you can communicate with their servers.  This holds true for items like a streaming media player.  Since I don't want manufacturers snooping around my network I finally tossed much of that stuff into a DMZ and monitored it for outbound traffic when I wasn't using it.   A sub 500 dollar firewall might seem like alot of money just think of the cost of having someone steal or delete your stuff.  No network is truly safe these days but at least you can send the majority looking for easier pray.  I especially recommend a firewall for even the smallest of businesses.  Now if I could only convince people that yes the first password I will try when hacking your system is "Password".
Kelly Jackson Higgins
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Kelly Jackson Higgins,
User Rank: Strategist
8/28/2014 | 3:55:38 PM
Re: Assessment Tools
Hi there David--Cool project! One common theme I've seen with a lot of the home automation stuff is that you need local/physical access to compromise these devices. How much did physical access play in your research? 

BTW, good thing you didn't mess with the kids' TV. 
Stratustician
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Stratustician,
User Rank: Moderator
8/28/2014 | 9:14:00 AM
Re: Assessment Tools
Great idea to put these devices in a DMZ or VLAN isolated from everything else.  While I am sure the hacker community has better things to do right now than target these devices, I am sure as more folks start linking cloud storage to them, or even local storage, the interest will increase significantly and we'll start to see more malware targeted towards these devices.
davidjacoby
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davidjacoby,
User Rank: Author
8/27/2014 | 3:59:37 PM
Re: Assessment Tools
Ryan, well, the problem with most IoT device is that you have very little control over them, but the most effective way to minimize the post-exploitation phase, and also minimize the risk that someone actually take advantage of these vulnerabilities is to put all your IoT devices in a seperate DMZ / VLAN, and restrict access TO the Internet from these devices.

Why would your printer or NAS need internet access? Maybe for updates? But then you can enable access to the update servers. 

 

But putting them in a restricted DMZ seems to bean effecting option right now.
Marilyn Cohodas
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Marilyn Cohodas,
User Rank: Strategist
8/27/2014 | 3:55:34 PM
Re: Assessment Tools & Lock down
Point taken! Hopefully the manufacturers (someday) will take care of those minor details.

:-)
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