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27 Million South Koreans Victimized In Online Gaming Heist
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Thomas Claburn
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Thomas Claburn,
User Rank: Ninja
8/26/2014 | 7:28:11 PM
Re: Human Error
I bet Blizzard, with its 2FA system, is feeling fairly smug right about now.
securityaffairs
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50%
securityaffairs,
User Rank: Ninja
8/26/2014 | 12:07:33 PM
Re: Human Error
Another interesting element to evaluate in this story is that South Korea is one of the countries that suffered the greatest number of data breaches and some experts speculated that they could be the results of state-sponsored hacking.

In the specific case I don't believe there is a relationship with information warfare operation despite the hacker who passed the stolen data was Chinese and China has always supported the greatest enemy of South Korea, the North Korea.
Whoopty
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50%
Whoopty,
User Rank: Ninja
8/26/2014 | 11:23:48 AM
Future
I get the feeling that as you guys say, biometrics may be the best way forward in the future, especially since there's a fair number of very personal body signatures that could identtify us. 

However in the mean time, while that sort of technology drops in price, two factor really is a must for communities of this size, it's too easy to exploit otherwise. 
Kelly Jackson Higgins
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50%
Kelly Jackson Higgins,
User Rank: Strategist
8/26/2014 | 10:28:20 AM
Re: Human Error
I'm personally all for biometrics, but that's probably a long way away from happening in online gaming. 2FA makes sense and ideally should be mandatory. 
RyanSepe
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50%
RyanSepe,
User Rank: Ninja
8/26/2014 | 8:25:42 AM
Re: Human Error
Biometrics is a good idea, but I think from a personal computing standpoint it would be hard to rationalize cost when multi factor authentication is available without it. I would think that tokens might be less cost intensive, one time password sent to devices, things of that nature.
Robert McDougal
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50%
Robert McDougal,
User Rank: Ninja
8/25/2014 | 11:14:54 PM
Human Error
The problem here is that as humans we usually follow the path of least resistance.  In this case these individuals probably know that two factor authentication is more secure, but don't want to use it because it causes minor inconvenience.  We need to find better two factor authentication sources that cause less heartburn in order to gain wider acceptance.  Biometrics maybe?


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