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6 Biometric Factors That Are Working Today
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Marilyn Cohodas
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Marilyn Cohodas,
User Rank: Strategist
8/27/2014 | 7:09:31 AM
Re: correct me if I'm wrong
It could be a combo of the "good old fashioned" password with a biometric for a while. But I still believe the future is with biometrics... especially as these factors become more common and accepted. 
Bprince
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Bprince,
User Rank: Ninja
8/27/2014 | 12:14:47 AM
Re: correct me if I'm wrong
I still believe in the good old fashion password, but I would like to see retina scanners used. Not like Minority Report exactly, but I think as an authentication measure I find it fascinating. 

BP
Robert McDougal
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Robert McDougal,
User Rank: Ninja
8/18/2014 | 8:10:49 AM
Re: correct me if I'm wrong
CardicRythm is pretty close, but you are right it requires that "intrusive" wearable bracelet.  I am hoping for sensors so sensitive they can detect the minute electrical fields surrounding us all.

Yeah, I am a big nerd.....
Marilyn Cohodas
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Marilyn Cohodas,
User Rank: Strategist
8/18/2014 | 7:33:44 AM
Re: correct me if I'm wrong
Isn't that how Cardiac Rhythm works? That sounds like a pretty cool and promising biometric, although it sounds like it would require a wearable bracelet of some sort, which some people might find intrustive. (sigh)  No perfect solution. But we can't let perfect be the enemy of good!
MarilynCoh
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MarilynCoh,
User Rank: Apprentice
8/16/2014 | 1:02:54 PM
Re: correct me if I'm wrong
Ok. I concede that there is a lot of skepticism about fingerprints -- legitimate or not. But what about some of the other types? Eye, Palm, behavioral? Does any one agree with me that some type of biometric is preferable to passwords?
Robert McDougal
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Robert McDougal,
User Rank: Ninja
8/16/2014 | 10:20:02 AM
Re: correct me if I'm wrong
Call me paranoid, but I don't like fingerprint authentication.  It could be because of all of those James Bond movies but I see my fingerprint as a liability.

Let's say that someone wants to authenticate as me.  They follow me to starbucks where I proceed to buy an Venti White Mocha =), which I consume in the store.  I throw my empty container in the trash and leave.  The attacke walks over to the trash pulls out my empty container and now they have my fingerprint.
Robert McDougal
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Robert McDougal,
User Rank: Ninja
8/16/2014 | 10:16:55 AM
Re: correct me if I'm wrong
If we use DNA, what about twins?
Robert McDougal
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50%
Robert McDougal,
User Rank: Ninja
8/16/2014 | 10:15:37 AM
Re: correct me if I'm wrong
Call me Mr. Sci-Fi but I would like to see authentication based on a persons unique electrical field.  Walk up to a device it detects the faint electrical field surrounding you and grants you access.
bpaddock
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bpaddock,
User Rank: Strategist
8/15/2014 | 12:46:16 PM
Re: correct me if I'm wrong
For a short time period cars sold in Japan had fingerprint scanners in place of the door locks.  That technology rapidly went back to keys when thugs started cutting off fingers to steal the cars.

Show me a biometric scanner, such as one based on the eye, that will authenticate you after you've been hit in the face by an airbag in a car accident.  Airbags are *not* big fluffy pillows when you are going 50+ MPH.  How happy will you be that you can't call your family for help because your phone things they injured you, is not you?

 

 

 
bpaddock
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bpaddock,
User Rank: Strategist
8/15/2014 | 12:46:06 PM
Re: correct me if I'm wrong
For a short time period cars sold in Japan had fingerprint scanners in place of the door locks.  That technology rapidly went back to keys when thugs started cutting off fingers to steal the cars.

Show me a biometric scanner, such as one based on the eye, that will authenticate you after you've been hit in the face by an airbag in a car accident.  Airbags are *not* big fluffy pillows when you are going 50+ MPH.  How happy will you be that you can't call your family for help because your phone things they injured you, is not you?

 

 

 
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