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Google Privacy Changes: 6 Steps To Take
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IlyaG960
IlyaG960,
User Rank: Apprentice
5/19/2015 | 1:36:42 PM
The Era of Absolute Privacy is coming! No need in queries, cookies or browsing history anymore.
Good news! The Era of Absolute Privacy is coming! No need in queries, cookies or browsing history anymore.

Google cannot protect privacy by definition: as the source of statistics (for gained from texts phrases) Google uses popularity, how popular are the phrases among people that typed the same search queries/ search for the same. Google cannot exist without spying.

However, there is structured data that can search for people - not people for information, but information for people. I discovered and patented how to structure any data: Language has its own Internal parsing, indexing and statistics. For instance, there are two sentences:

a) 'Sam!'
b) 'A loud ringing of one of the bells was followed by the appearance of a
smart chambermaid in the upper sleeping gallery, who, after tapping at
one of the doors, and receiving a request from within, called over the
balustrades -'Sam!'.'

Evidently, that the 'Sam' has different importance into both sentences, in regard to extra information in both. This distinction is reflected as the phrases, which contain 'Sam', weights: the first has 1, the second – 0.08; the greater weight signifies stronger emotional 'acuteness'.
First you need to parse obtaining phrases from clauses, restoring omitted words, for sentences and paragraphs.
Next, you calculate Internal statistics, weights; where the weight refers to the frequency that a phrase occurs in relation to other phrases.
After that data is indexed by common dictionary, like Webster, and annotated by subtexts.
This is a small sample of the structured data:
this - signify - <> : 333333
both - are - once : 333333
confusion - signify - <> : 333321
speaking - done - once : 333112
speaking - was - both : 333109
place - is - in : 250000
To see the validity of technology - pick up any sentence.

Do you have a pencil?

My technology came from Analytic Philosophy, Internal Relations Theory.
Number 6
Number 6,
User Rank: Apprentice
3/5/2012 | 5:30:23 PM
re: Google Privacy Changes: 6 Steps To Take
I use 2 browsers: IE configured to accept all cookies and Firefox configured to ask. Use Firefox for serious work and IE for temporary searches. Wipe out IE's cookies every couple weeks. With Firefox, first deny, and if needed accept for session only. Remember only for sites I regularly visit.

With a firewall, have never had a problem.
kiapiz
kiapiz,
User Rank: Apprentice
3/3/2012 | 10:06:06 PM
re: Google Privacy Changes: 6 Steps To Take
Checkout http://donottrack.me

Simple steps to opt-out from Ad Networks tracking you
You can also clean the data collected about you.
SLINK000
SLINK000,
User Rank: Apprentice
3/3/2012 | 1:29:33 PM
re: Google Privacy Changes: 6 Steps To Take
One thing that I don't see is a suggestion to manually accept all cookies. Of course this is a hassle for a little while while you build up the list of accept/reject cookies, but I can say that I have never had an unrecoverable virus/spyware problem. And the count of problems in many years stands at two, I believe. I mentioned this trick in my book - Link Em Up on Outlook - and bring it up every time that I can. It seems that not too many people embrace this simple step.
Number 6
Number 6,
User Rank: Apprentice
3/2/2012 | 6:30:00 PM
re: Google Privacy Changes: 6 Steps To Take
Wish the headline wasn't misleading. 6 steps are more like 2 useful, Google-specific steps, 2 non-Google suggestions and 2 funny but not really useful suggestions. Heading back to my cave now before Number 2 spots me.
ANON1237925156805
ANON1237925156805,
User Rank: Apprentice
3/1/2012 | 9:35:51 PM
re: Google Privacy Changes: 6 Steps To Take
Oops! I menat to say even in the space that we CAN control no one is really willing to give up their newfound conveniences to protect their anonymity. The Googles of the world know this.
ANON1237925156805
ANON1237925156805,
User Rank: Apprentice
3/1/2012 | 9:32:54 PM
re: Google Privacy Changes: 6 Steps To Take
This is a sad place we've ended up in. What we defeated post J. Edgar with laws like the Freedom of Information act we are now giving back without a thought. We have no idea who's got what data and what they will do with it.

Thanks to the Patriot Act, that's true even at the gov't level over which we have no apparent control. As you write, even in the space we can't control, no one is really willing to give up their newfound conveniences to protect their anonymity. So we are walking down a very unfamiliar path. By the time the first major calamity happens it'll be too late to turn back.

Stay tuned.
joe345
joe345,
User Rank: Apprentice
3/1/2012 | 3:14:23 PM
re: Google Privacy Changes: 6 Steps To Take
What about using add-ons like TrackMeNot?


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