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Biggest Cache of Stolen Creds Ever Includes 1.2 Billion Unique Logins
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William L. Lind
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William L. Lind,
User Rank: Apprentice
8/6/2014 | 1:03:15 AM
Apprecaited
This is not held for the first time in the history of the world, we heard many times like this news. The Russian internet security department should be more aware of it. The homework help online provides the great services for the students who are seeking help for their academic assignment. I will comeback here soon for more details.
securityaffairs
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securityaffairs,
User Rank: Ninja
8/6/2014 | 6:04:56 AM
The change
Cybercrime is showing an increasing interest in the sale of stolen personal information, including user's credentials and emails that are considered precious commodities in the underground.

The number of data breaches is tripled 

The amount of data this ring collected spotlights on the necessity to improve protection of our digital identities. Username and passwords are no more enough, people must be trained to know the threats, the risks and to teach them best practices.

We need a layered approach to cyber security ... cybercrime is even more dangerous ... let's imagine what an attacker can do with this information ... amazing.

 

http://securityaffairs.co/wordpress/27378/cyber-crime/1-billion-stolen-credentials.html

http://securityaffairs/.cowordspres/22904/cyber-crime/marketing-approach-cybercrime-phishing-emails.html

http://securityaffairs.co/wordpress/19957/cyber-crime/cyber-criminal-underground.html
progman2000
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progman2000,
User Rank: Apprentice
8/6/2014 | 6:57:58 AM
SQL injection attacks?
How is it that sites are still vulnerable to SQL injection attacks?  Its hard to believe this is still one of the main threats to website security.
Dr.T
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Dr.T,
User Rank: Ninja
8/6/2014 | 10:36:39 AM
Re: SQL injection attacks?
Mainly old sites that were not re-developed with the latest frameworks. If we are still using ASP pages of course that would be a good option for black hats to try and exercise their skills.
prospecttoreza
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prospecttoreza,
User Rank: Strategist
8/6/2014 | 11:03:57 AM
Re: SQL injection attacks?
how's asp classic is any worse than java?

a good framework helps, but the biggest problem is the dynamic sql - concatenated in code from strings such as "select ... where col1 = '" & var1 & "' and col2 = '" and so on.

as long as you keep your sql in stored procedures, and set up the access correctly, you should be ok.

but it takes a lot of planning and dedication to keep the database access under control. it is so much easier for a programmer to just create that select on the fly, and for the manager to keep a blind eye to it.

so sql injection will live on.
Whoopty
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Whoopty,
User Rank: Ninja
8/6/2014 | 8:39:08 AM
Self-serving
While it's good Hold Security has told us about this, I feel like its silence on many counts seems a bit self serving. It claims that some are still vulnerable, which makes sense not to name and shame them, since it could result in people's updated accounts being re-exploited. 

However, the fact that it signed NDAs for some companies seems like it received some sort of payoff to protect their reputation(s). If it was really trying to help the consumer, it would let us know of the worst culprits of lax security. 
briancobbler
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briancobbler,
User Rank: Apprentice
8/6/2014 | 4:48:23 PM
Re: Self-serving
I find it more interesting that Hold is going to offer a service to allow individuals to pay (based on other reports) to determine if you were compromised. The Hold webpage indicates that they even plan to ask for your passwords for this service.

"We have developed a secure methodology for you to share with us a very strong (SHA512) cryptographic representation of your passwords for verification."

What happened to security rule #1 being "don't give out your passwords" and now the people who are supposedly security exports are planning to ask for all of everyones passwords as part of their service. Any respect I had for Hold, just went out the window.

http://www.holdsecurity.com/news/cybervor-breach/
Dolos.Apate
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Dolos.Apate,
User Rank: Apprentice
8/7/2014 | 4:17:05 PM
Re: Self-serving
They are not asking you for your password. They are asking you for a Hash of your password, which they can then use to check if someone else has your password.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Cryptographic_hash_function
Robert McDougal
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Robert McDougal,
User Rank: Ninja
8/11/2014 | 11:43:22 AM
Re: Self-serving
I think Hold Security is just trying for headlines and money here.  They will not disclose how they discovered the credentials but for $120/ year they will let you know if you are on the list.  Sounds fishy to me.

http://tech.firstpost.com/news-analysis/one-billion-password-theft-firm-wants-users-to-pay-120-to-know-if-their-account-was-compromised-228573.html
prospecttoreza
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prospecttoreza,
User Rank: Strategist
8/6/2014 | 9:40:09 AM
a billion credentials is stolen
- and then what?

It somehow seems nonconsequential. So spammers send more spam - so what.

Say, when Target got hacked into, the damage was about 100M - although we do not know how this damage is calculated, but at least we know there was damage.

There is a disconnect between the media coverage of the sizes on the breaches, and the lack of media coverage of the consequences.

 

 

 
Dr.T
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Dr.T,
User Rank: Ninja
8/6/2014 | 10:33:21 AM
Re: a billion credentials is stolen
They may not end up with anything but this shows there are good amount of sites out there that are vulnerable to SQL injections.
Dr.T
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Dr.T,
User Rank: Ninja
8/6/2014 | 10:31:26 AM
Not the number of records
 

The amount is huge and that make is impressive, however if you total last the breaches that will go beyond that, most of the time it is not the number of record it is what they end up with. Most passwords in most system are hashed, if a good algorithm is used it will take time for them to get the password and it may not even be worth after a while.
marklfeller
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marklfeller,
User Rank: Apprentice
8/6/2014 | 3:58:22 PM
asada
My last pay check was $9500 working 12 hours a week online. My sisters friend has been averaging 15k for months now and she works about 20 hours a week. I can't believe how easy it was once I tried it out. This is what I do,

 

 

=======================

WWW.JOBS606.COM

======================= 
Steve Riley
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Steve Riley,
User Rank: Author
8/15/2014 | 3:44:47 PM
Count me skeptical
A lot of people are beginning to question the veracity of this story. For example, The Lie Behind 1.2 Billion Stolen Passwords:

Let's look at the warning signs right off the bat:

  • Announces 4 billion passwords have been taken across 420,000 websites
  • Makes zero indication on how he learned this or how he obtained the output of 420,000 website's U/P data
  • Unbiased sources who have met Holden describe him as a generally acceptable individual with an aggressive approach to establishing clients. Chris Roberts, founder of Denver's One World Labs, said that Holden "[...] has gone off and done his own thing [...] he has his way of doing it — very different than mine"
  • Refuses to indicate any of the sites compromised so that users can change their passwords as "there is an ongoing investigation"
  • No law enforcement agencies (local, state, or federal) have corroborated that they are investigating
  • Explains that he knows the names and locations of these hackers but not the group they are affiliated with
  • Offers a for-pay service for individuals and companies to see if their data is being compromised which is odd because that generally doesn't happen during an investigation
  • Lied about where he went to school and graduated — the 2001 engineering degree from the University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee? That never happened as Holden never graduated.
  • Released information specifically during BlackHat for maximum attention when a very similar story was released in February by Hold Security.
  • Individuals quickly chimed in with similar-but-different ulterior motives: Chase Cunningham and Brian Krebs
  • Lacking a name for the criminal group, Holden simply references them as CyberVor — Vor meaning "thief" in Russian.
  • States that the "group" purchased large numbers of U/P lists; however, makes zero indication where the stolen content ends and the bought content begins.

Forbes: Firm That Exposed Breach Of 'Billion Passwords' Quickly Offered $120 Service To Find Out If You're Affected

The Verge: The Russian 'Hack of the Century' Doesn't Add Up

IT World: Massive Russian Hack Has Researchers Scratching Their Heads

Bruce Schneier: Over a Billion Passwords Stolen?

As expected, the hype is pretty high over this. But from the beginning, the story didn't make sense to me. There are obvious details missing: are the passwords in plaintext or encrypted, what sites are they for, how did they end up with a single criminal gang? The Milwaukee company that pushed this story, Hold Security, isn't a company that I had ever heard of before. (I was with Howard Schmidt when I first heard this story. He lives in Wisconsin, and he had never heard of the company before, either.) The New York Times writes that "a security expert not affiliated with Hold Security analyzed the database of stolen credentials and confirmed it was authentic," but we're not given any details. This felt more like a PR story from the company than anything real.

And a decent Reddit thread

kstaron
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kstaron,
User Rank: Apprentice
8/28/2014 | 3:17:15 PM
Scary if true
While some people may be skeptical becasue the company won't divulge how they got the information that might be more due to the fact if they did someone is going to get a lot of attention from Russian criminals. However the part where the company now offers a service to tell you if you're on the list isn't doing their reputation any favors given what they are charging for a search of a single login on a list they already have. If true though, very scary as someone who has to rely on several companies to keep my info secure.


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