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'Energetic' Bear Under The Microscope
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BoatnerB
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BoatnerB,
User Rank: Author
8/1/2014 | 10:22:52 AM
Interesting piece
Interesting reading, Kelly!
securityaffairs
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securityaffairs,
User Rank: Ninja
8/1/2014 | 9:26:33 AM
Re: state-sponsored hacking
Dear Kelly,

I suspect that they have used them, but we are not able to detect any similar intrusion due to the difficulties to track high sophisticated APT (e.g. State-sponsored malware).

Anyway, as you have remarked, it is worrying that the bad actors succeeded also exploiting poorly configured servers.

Thanks
Kelly Jackson Higgins
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Kelly Jackson Higgins,
User Rank: Strategist
8/1/2014 | 9:19:50 AM
Re: state-sponsored hacking
Appparently, they really didn't need 0days, which is sad but reality.
securityaffairs
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securityaffairs,
User Rank: Ninja
8/1/2014 | 9:01:20 AM
Re: state-sponsored hacking
yes Kelly you are right ... comments in the code, as explained by other security firms, seems indicate that hackers have Russian origin. I believe it is very strange that no zero-day exploits were used in the campaign, I believe that there are a lot of details still uncovered.

 
Kelly Jackson Higgins
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Kelly Jackson Higgins,
User Rank: Strategist
8/1/2014 | 7:54:22 AM
Re: state-sponsored hacking
State-sponsored is definitely the assumption on this campaign. It's interesting that Kaspersky Lab is saying they can't confirm it's Russian-based. CrowdStrike and F-Secure have indicated it's out of Russia. But attribution can be tricky, as we've seen.
securityaffairs
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securityaffairs,
User Rank: Ninja
8/1/2014 | 6:25:07 AM
state-sponsored hacking
Despite the attribution is very difficult and the bad actors behind the campaign haven't used any sophisticated strain of malware, I believe that the APT has a state-sponsored origin.

Statistics on working time, dimension of the architecture and targeted industries suggest me that we are facing with a cyber espionage campaign arranged by a government ... and probably this is just the tip of the iceberg.


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