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Nigerian 419 Scammers Evolving Into Malware Pushers (But Not Very Good Ones)
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Marilyn Cohodas
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Marilyn Cohodas,
User Rank: Strategist
7/28/2014 | 12:23:42 PM
Re: Executables in Emails?
My thinking is that the earlier good practices can be drummed in the better. I've seen many tweens with smartphones! Then by the time the judgement kicks in in the mid 20s, presumaby some of the basics will be already baked in...
Marilyn Cohodas
50%
50%
Marilyn Cohodas,
User Rank: Strategist
7/28/2014 | 12:23:37 PM
Re: Executables in Emails?
My thinking is that the earlier good practices can be drummed in the better. I've seen many tweens with smartphones! Then by the time the judgement kicks in in the mid 20s, presumaby some of the basics will be already baked in...
Marilyn Cohodas
50%
50%
Marilyn Cohodas,
User Rank: Strategist
7/28/2014 | 12:23:32 PM
Re: Executables in Emails?
My thinking is that the earlier good practices can be drummed in the better. I've seen many tweens with smartphones! Then by the time the judgement kicks in in the mid 20s, presumaby some of the basics will be already baked in...
RyanSepe
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50%
RyanSepe,
User Rank: Ninja
7/28/2014 | 12:20:04 PM
Re: Executables in Emails?
This does make sense from an impulse perspective but then what are the action items? Educating people at a younger age to protect against phisihing? My high school had CISCO Networking classes and basic computer classes but I have not seen a InfoSec related class or one that taught InfoSec related principles. 

Or would this be better projected at the university level which comprises the age most susceptible for exploitation?
Marilyn Cohodas
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Marilyn Cohodas,
User Rank: Strategist
7/25/2014 | 9:56:53 AM
Re: Executables in Emails?
As the parent of a 24-year old (who probably should know better), I'm not surprised that that demographic is more susceptiable to a phishing attack. That's a very impulsive age at which point the "judgement" brain cells have not fully matured. The rental car industry figured that out a long time ago when they set 26 as the minimum age that people can rent a car without a big  surcharge.
RyanSepe
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RyanSepe,
User Rank: Ninja
7/25/2014 | 8:46:13 AM
Re: Executables in Emails?
Very interesting thanks for the reply. Some of the most interesting pieces from that article was that ages 18-25 are the most susceptible age bracking for phishing attacks. I thought it would be the opposite.

Also, that women are more susceptible than men statistically. The article attributes this to less technical training however I am not convinced. In the study was half women and half men with men receiving 48% training materials and women receiving 52% which is pretty much even. So I don't think the results support their hypothesis. But I cannot think of other reasoning as to why this would be true. 
Manos Chatzikyriakos
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Manos Chatzikyriakos,
User Rank: Apprentice
7/24/2014 | 10:56:02 AM
Re: Executables in Emails?
You might find this paper interesting. It's about a study on the subject you mentioned, different factors that might have an impact someone's behaviour susceptibility to falling victims of phising attacks. 

http://lorrie.cranor.org/pubs/pap1162-sheng.pdf

The paper is a derivative of a thesis which you can find online if you need the full information.
RyanSepe
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50%
RyanSepe,
User Rank: Ninja
7/24/2014 | 10:30:24 AM
Re: Executables in Emails?
Understood, does anyone know if there is an age demographic that shows those who respond to phishing attacks? I am just curious because I know a large percentage of exploited individuals are elderly in terms of technology/financial scams. I would be interested to see if they are the largest group who open unknown attachements.
Manos Chatzikyriakos
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Manos Chatzikyriakos,
User Rank: Apprentice
7/24/2014 | 10:00:01 AM
Re: Executables in Emails?
Unfortunately you would be surprised by how many people would actually do that. It doesn't take more than poor social enginnering skills and a .exe file named "picture.exe.jpg"
RyanSepe
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RyanSepe,
User Rank: Ninja
7/23/2014 | 8:47:16 AM
Executables in Emails?
Some of this was actually quite comical. But on a serious note, to confirm with your article, they are sending .exe's in the email attachment? Just to be clear, I am unsure as to why anyone would use an executable from an email. 


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