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Google's Privacy Invasion: It's Your Fault
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Steven Noyes
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Steven Noyes,
User Rank: Apprentice
2/19/2012 | 7:00:55 PM
re: Google's Privacy Invasion: It's Your Fault
Sadly, Google's "Do no evil" went out of the door with their Google Books project. From that point on, it has been a steady down hill slide for them where the only thing they see in getting more and more information tied into their advertising networks regardless of who actually owns that information/data/IP.

So don't ever anticipate the "Don't be evil" to every be made "official". It was lost long ago:-(
DSMITH7949
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DSMITH7949,
User Rank: Apprentice
2/19/2012 | 1:43:59 PM
re: Google's Privacy Invasion: It's Your Fault
Privacy is more than collecting names. If I decide to drive somewhere today, it's not your business where I go; in fact, if you follow me, you are stalking me which is a crime.
DAGOSTA000
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DAGOSTA000,
User Rank: Apprentice
2/19/2012 | 12:11:40 PM
re: Google's Privacy Invasion: It's Your Fault
Yup, I guess it is National Judgmental Ass Day!
DAGOSTA000
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DAGOSTA000,
User Rank: Apprentice
2/19/2012 | 12:10:48 PM
re: Google's Privacy Invasion: It's Your Fault
Dear Emeritus,

We're sorry that we didn't know that digital information would be invented when we said "secure in their possessions" or we'd have been specific.

Yours Truly,

Old wig-wearing white guys
mrtt
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mrtt,
User Rank: Apprentice
2/18/2012 | 10:11:12 PM
re: Google's Privacy Invasion: It's Your Fault
A few years ago I had an idea for a website that would let users exchange messages and files by posting them (similar to what they do on MySpace or Facebook) but with the confidence that everything they uploaded or posted was encrypted while in-transit and at-rest. In addition, I wanted the user to have the option to control the passkeys used in the encryption process to insure that their encrypted data could not be compromised by anyone, not even the database owner. It started simple and ended up with a rich set of the latest and greatest privacy options like two-factor authentication, auto logoff, email and SMS notifications. I though I was on to something, especially with all the uproar around Facebook's privacy practices. I made it simple to use, ad free and cost free. I did it because I needed a challenge. What I learned was that people like to complain about Privacy, but don't want to do anything about it if it means learning something new or straying from what is considered mainstream. Have you heard much about Diaspora lately?

In case you are still reading and are wondering what happened to the website, it's still out there. A few new users sign up every week. I won't post the name here, but if you Google "private secure encrypted", it is the first non-ad search result.
boohoosoo
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boohoosoo,
User Rank: Apprentice
2/18/2012 | 7:41:51 PM
re: Google's Privacy Invasion: It's Your Fault
Call me an aluminum foil hat person, but I have been feeling queasy about Google power-playing for a very long time, and I am not a bandwagon person.

However I liked this article for the wonderful fact that it pointed out exactly what the definitive problem is. We have been baited with free service, and Google has provided a wonderful product. I have really come to rely on Google for just about everything...AND THEREIN LIES THE PROBLEM. Have any of you tried to un-encumber yourself of Google's influence? It's pretty near futile. Even the alternative search engines rely on Google for info. Alternate emails are good. Trying to get your old emails back that are archived on Google not so easy.

Many people have not thought through about the fragility of our cyber-dependent status. And this article points it out in brilliant relief! If we want to disengage from Google, it will cost us plenty, whether it's setting up our paid private privileged network, or whether it's giving up our unwittingly posted family photos, letters, and archived business records.

Linux is looking good. At least I would know their limits, and I have now learned not to tip my hand. There are zealous people who know not what kind of can of worms they are dealing with here. Big brother/business/government is infiltrating the whole system, and I am extremely uneasy about it. Get out the washboard and the buggy.
Emeritus
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Emeritus,
User Rank: Apprentice
2/18/2012 | 6:52:55 PM
re: Google's Privacy Invasion: It's Your Fault
Actually privacy is not a term which appears in the Constitution, and is largely a 20th century invention. (a good one to be sure, but a recent concept). Privacy against government Action and privacy in the private sector have fundamentally different origins. Roe v Wade was the culmination of an evolution in the concept of behavioral privacy. Informational privacy in the private sector has been largely statutory.
Michael_
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Michael_,
User Rank: Apprentice
2/18/2012 | 6:48:29 PM
re: Google's Privacy Invasion: It's Your Fault
People are too lazy or stupid that they have tools like NoScript and Adblock yet they don't use them. It's easier for them to point to the fingers at somebody else. There are plenty of tools out there to keep information private, but people choose to not use them. Is it Google's fault that people are too lazy to actually learn the tools they use on a regular basis? It's the same with people who complain how their computer doesn't work right and it gives them "so much trouble", when there is nothing wrong with the computer, they are just too lazy to actually spend the time to learn the highly complicated machine they rely on day to day.
Michael_
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Michael_,
User Rank: Apprentice
2/18/2012 | 6:41:33 PM
re: Google's Privacy Invasion: It's Your Fault
People need to stop complaining and take off their aluminum foil hats thinking that Google is out to get them. Am I the only one that's getting sick and tired of people whining like babies about privacy policies from companies like Google and Facebook? Whatever happened to "if you don't like it's policies, don't use it!"?

I use ad blockers, I clear out my cookies all the time, I clear my cache regularly, I don't use services that I don't like. My only complaints? The people who are constantly making a mountain out of a mole hill. I don't put personal information on the internet that I don't want people to have. Pretty damn simple if you ask me.

What I find even funnier, is that the people I see in my personal life that complain about these privacy policies are people who have NO clue what they are talking about, they just complain about them because they hear brief snippets about "privacy concerns" and they just jump on the bandwagon. They don't even know what cookies are, let alone JavaScript. Yet... they keep on using Facebook like it's their job. So let me get this straight, you do not like this web page, yet you use it constantly, as well as use it to complain about the FREE service that you are using religiously?
ageofknowledge
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ageofknowledge,
User Rank: Apprentice
2/18/2012 | 6:39:10 PM
re: Google's Privacy Invasion: It's Your Fault
The way China is going, they might end up with your personal information if you're not careful.

http://www.businessweek.com/ne...

http://www.independent.co.uk/n...

http://abcnews.go.com/Internat...
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