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The Mystery Of The TrueCrypt Encryption Software Shutdown
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Kelly Jackson Higgins
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Kelly Jackson Higgins,
User Rank: Strategist
5/30/2014 | 1:36:46 PM
TruCrypt users
Anyone out there left high and dry by this? I'd love to hear some firsthand experience with the tool and what users plans are next.
theb0x
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theb0x,
User Rank: Ninja
5/30/2014 | 4:14:50 PM
Re: TruCrypt users
I do recall in 2009 a bootkit was developed called Stoned which could successfully bypass TrueCrypt. Stoned injects itself into the MBR, a record which remains unencrypted even if the hard disk itself is fully encrypted. During startup, the BIOS first calls the bootkit, which in turn starts the TrueCrypt boot loader. Stoned uses a "double forward" to redirect I/O interrupt 13h, which allows it to insert itself between the Windows calls and TrueCrypt.

I would like to point out that this attack DOES require either physical access to the PC with the user already logged in with admin rights or an end user must be enticed to execute the malware. This DOES NOT actually break the encryption but rather acts as a MITM attack.

TrueCrypt is simply not designed to handle this method of attack.

This method could be applied to other software based encryption such as BitLocker and PGP.

Another flaw is that TrueCrypt stores it's keys in RAM and has been confirmed to be vulnerable to a Cold Boot Attack. This is where the booted machine is powered off and the RAM modules are quickly frozen and the keys can be extracted.

Again, this method requires physical access to the machine that is powered on or suspended.

In conclusion, as long as the attacker has physical or administrative access to the system, software based encryption will never work.

 
shakeeb
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shakeeb,
User Rank: Apprentice
5/31/2014 | 2:44:36 AM
Re: TruCrypt users
@theb0x – thanks for sharing, does this mean that hackers can't get through without having physical access to the system?
shakeeb
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shakeeb,
User Rank: Apprentice
5/31/2014 | 2:42:18 AM
Re: TruCrypt users
It's scary to see how software encryption will no longer help us to protect our data. I wonder what TruCrypt users will do next to ensure their data is kept safe. 
AbeG
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AbeG,
User Rank: Apprentice
6/16/2014 | 10:15:57 PM
Re: TruCrypt users
@shakeeb.  There are a number of alternatives for TrueCrypt.  I ran a search on alternative.to (http://alternativeto.net/software/truecrypt/) and looks like everyone should consider switching over to DiskCryptor.

I thought this was a compelling argument:

"The only open-source alternative to DiskCryptor that has comparable features is TrueCrypt. However, because of the restrictive license under which TrueCrypt is provided — the TrueCrypt Collective License — TrueCrypt cannot be classified as a truly free software, as it places limits on the use and modification of its source code by developers. There are other alternatives with similar functionality, but they are fully proprietary ones, which makes them unacceptable to use for protection of confidential data."
AbeG
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AbeG,
User Rank: Apprentice
6/16/2014 | 10:36:29 PM
Re: TruCrypt users
I can't imagine how any corporation with a responsible IT Department would be able to justify widescale use of truecrypt.  Assuming that no security issues are found with TrueCrypt, it's a great program.  However, it cannot be centraly managed, and for an Enterprise, that alone is usually a deal breaker.

It's hard to get upset with an open source project like this that is loved by many yet funded by few.  It seems as though software development is sharing the same fate as media organizations.  The trend being that high quality content/software should be funded by advertising, except when advertising interferes too much with the product.  In those cases, the product should be free with no advertising.
RetiredUser
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RetiredUser,
User Rank: Ninja
5/30/2014 | 6:26:47 PM
http://truecrypt.ch/
I've never used TrueCrypt, but have always been aware of it as a FOSS user and supporter.  I find it interesting how quickly http://truecrypt.ch/ was raised with the seeming intent to continue TrueCrypt as a forked project.  In the FOSS world there is absolutely nothing odd about this; I'm forking a codebase right now, in fact.  But because this is TrueCrypt, one wonders at the motivation for the Swiss team.  I suspect there is a money pile waiting for the right group that can support TrueCrypt as a service provider for those IT shops using the software that would rather stagnate than evolve.  I think the fork is the right thing to do, provided the new team has the needed skills to move the project forward. 

Note:  Search off the phrase "TrueCrypt Developers Association. All rights reserved." and you will find many other projects that include embedded TrueCrypt code.  Food for thought...
shakeeb
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shakeeb,
User Rank: Apprentice
5/31/2014 | 2:47:07 AM
Re: http://truecrypt.ch/
@christianabryant- I feel that these encryption tools need to evolve. Some of them are still in the initial versions (no one has taken steps to upgrade them as the threats increase). 
RyanSepe
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RyanSepe,
User Rank: Ninja
5/31/2014 | 10:47:50 PM
Re: http://truecrypt.ch/
I agree, we need to understand that though its difficult to update encryption technologies its very necessary. Think of it as patching a security safeguard. Security tools need to evolve in hopes to combat volatile emergent threats. 
gev
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gev,
User Rank: Moderator
6/2/2014 | 2:45:44 PM
Take it at face value
Right there at the top of the page, it says:

 

The development of TrueCrypt was ended in 5/2014 after Microsoft terminated support of Windows XP. Windows 8/7/Vista and later offer integrated support for encrypted disks and virtual disk images.

 

How come the author ignores the simplest explanation?

Because then there would be mistery, and hence no article.
securityaffairs
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securityaffairs,
User Rank: Ninja
6/2/2014 | 2:54:51 PM
Re: Take it at face value
@gev

You wrote: 

"The development of TrueCrypt was ended in 5/2014 after Microsoft terminated support of Windows XP. Windows 8/7/Vista and later offer integrated support for encrypted disks and virtual disk images."

What does it mean? Have any idea of the number of downloads collected by TrueCrypt?

 

Do you believe that TrueCrypt users are only XP users?

I believe that there is much more.

 
freewill78
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freewill78,
User Rank: Apprentice
11/11/2014 | 5:50:21 PM
It is Obvious
Common, for me it is very clear; that government or security agents; could not find a hole and convience truecrypt guys to close it. I am sure microsoft has special holes for bitlocker. Everybody knows; apple, microsoft and big companies share information with national security agent. Gates also stated in an interveiw that they can share information for national benefits.

On the other hand; Me from outside of U.S.  I have no offense on these companies or national security agent; I love microsoft and its products; they are doing great things for the world development progress; and I can make money by help of their products.

 

 

 

 


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