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Iranian Cyberspies Pose as Journalists Online To Ensnare Their Targets
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Alison_Diana
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Alison_Diana,
User Rank: Moderator
5/29/2014 | 4:42:30 PM
A Fascinating Look
This gives a really fascinating look behind the scenes of a social engineering initiative, a long-time effort given that it dates back to 2011. Having interviewed experts in social engineering -- people who work with clients on preventative measures and best practices -- I believe this is one of the most challenging areas of security. As people, we want to trust. Our memories fail us; how many people "look or sound familiar" when we get a friend or connect request on FB or LI? Those in high-value positions must be especially aware. But as we know, even lower level targets are attractive as rungs on the ladder.
securityaffairs
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securityaffairs,
User Rank: Ninja
5/29/2014 | 4:49:23 PM
Re: A Fascinating Look
Social Media is  a powerful instrument for military operation. I wrote an excellent post on the topic more than one year ago where are explained all the techniques based on exploitation of social networking platform.

 

http://resources.infosecinstitute.com/social-media-use-in-the-military-sector/

 

Let me also another post we it is explained how to "poison" a social network for various purposes.

 

http://securityaffairs.co/wordpress/352/digital-id/social-network-poisoning-they-want-to-spy-on-us-we-evade.html

Regards

 

 
Marilyn Cohodas
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Marilyn Cohodas,
User Rank: Strategist
5/29/2014 | 4:50:30 PM
Traditional defenses
It's pretty scary to think how defenseless we are against social engineering. Are best-practices like "don't [connect] or friend people you don't know, and don't endorse them for skills on LinkedIn if you don't know" enough to stop a determinined attacker?
Marilyn Cohodas
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Marilyn Cohodas,
User Rank: Strategist
5/29/2014 | 4:50:36 PM
Traditional defenses
It's pretty scary to think how defenseless we are against social engineering. Are best-practices like "don't [connect] or friend people you don't know, and don't endorse them for skills on LinkedIn if you don't know" enough to stop a determinined attacker?
Kelly Jackson Higgins
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Kelly Jackson Higgins,
User Rank: Strategist
5/29/2014 | 4:58:15 PM
Re: A Fascinating Look
This is reminiscent of the controversial "Robin Sage" experiment conducted a few years back, where a phony persona was set up on LinkedIn, Facebook and Twitter to see who would connect to "Robin," who scored connections with people in the Joint Chiefs of Staff, the CIO of the NSA, an intelligence director for the U.S. Marines, a chief of staff for the U.S. House of Representatives, and several Pentagon and DoD employees. "She" even got job offers and dinner invites. Robin Sage and this Iranian campaign demonstrate how easy it is to fall into the trap of trusting someone online without truly vetting them. Anyone can fall victim to this, which is what makes it so disturbing.

 

 
Alison_Diana
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Alison_Diana,
User Rank: Moderator
5/29/2014 | 5:01:18 PM
Re: Traditional defenses
No, I don't think those suggestions are good enough. Especially when you're dealing with a group like this, which uses real journalists' names to try and reach its targets. 
Alison_Diana
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Alison_Diana,
User Rank: Moderator
5/29/2014 | 5:04:52 PM
Re: A Fascinating Look
That's wild -- but it's easy to see how people could fall for it. I recall almost falling victim to something a few weeks ago when a real friend's Facebook was hijacked. A fraudulent account was created in his name and the fraudster sent friend requests out. Fortunately, my real friend notified all his contacts about the fake account set up in his name (with his photo) so I didn't accept the duplicate friend request. But I would have done, probably, thinking he or FB had done something to his original account by mistake. 

And we all meet so many people that it's hard to recall all their names. If someone seems legit and mentions meeting you at a conference three months ago, odds are many of us might take this at face value rather than run the risk of offending someone who appeared legit!
Kelly Jackson Higgins
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Kelly Jackson Higgins,
User Rank: Strategist
5/29/2014 | 5:07:32 PM
Re: A Fascinating Look
So true. I find myself thinking I have to appear rude rather than risk getting 0wned when I get requests for connections to folks I don't know or remember!
Alison_Diana
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Alison_Diana,
User Rank: Moderator
5/29/2014 | 5:11:37 PM
Re: A Fascinating Look
Exactly! I have several people hanging in limbo right now for that very reason! Though I doubt any of them are losing sleep over it. :)
Bprince
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Bprince,
User Rank: Ninja
5/29/2014 | 9:50:16 PM
Re: Traditional defenses
It is very easy to fall for something like that on a social network, especially after the scammer gets one person who you trust to friend them. Then it can cascade, because other people will say, 'well if so and so knows her from our company, I must have met her as well' or 'that person must be trustworthy.' It is a good way to conduct reconnaissance for spear-phishing. 

BP
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