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A Year Later, Most Americans Think Snowden Did The Right Thing
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Lorna Garey
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Lorna Garey,
User Rank: Ninja
5/29/2014 | 3:50:12 PM
Re: Definitely the right thing!
Look, I know Snowden and his apologists love to wrap themselves in the constitution. But you have no expectation of privacy in data you turn over to someone else. SCOTUS has clearly said we don't have the same expectation of privacy in, say, our cars that we do at home. So when the NSA comes and kicks down your door and confiscates your metadata, come talk to me.
Robert McDougal
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Robert McDougal,
User Rank: Ninja
5/29/2014 | 3:42:34 PM
Re: Definitely the right thing!
You mention that Snowden should have made the revelations in a responsible manner.  Unfortunately, that was tried before by three different men.  Those men had their careers ruined and had criminal investigations launched against them.  To me it is no wonder that Snowden choose this route. Former NSA whistleblowers 

I would like to point out as well that the US Constitution is the highest form of law in the land.  The US Constitution is the fundamental law of the land for the United States so I don't understand your comment about this being a rule of law issue not a constitutional issue.

Just so I am clear, do you think one man breaking a contract and stealing company data is a greater crime than the willful violation of the US constitution and a multitude of federal laws?

 
Robert McDougal
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Robert McDougal,
User Rank: Ninja
5/29/2014 | 3:08:09 PM
Re: Not a Whistleblower...
Obviously you are extremely passionate on this subject, so I have a few questions for you.

In your view, what laws did Snowden break to make him as you so elegantly state a "rat bastard criminal"?

What proof do you have that proves he is aiding and abetting the Russians?

Could you please ellaborate on the extensive oversight, audit and checking process conducted at the NSA?  

Lastly, I appreciate your article yet I don't see how an interview with a former NSA chief is a non-biased source of information.  Could you please clarify why you believe this to be an objective source of information?
Lorna Garey
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Lorna Garey,
User Rank: Ninja
5/29/2014 | 3:00:39 PM
Re: Definitely the right thing!
Sorry, also calling BS here. Had he made these revelations in a responsible manner, then stayed around and dealt with the fallout, he'd be a whistleblower. He didn't. He stole data, broke his employment contract, fled the country, and damaged our national security. That makes him a criminal and a traitor. This is not a constitutional issue. It's a rule of law issue.

Oh, and in terms of public sentiment? Most Americans care about the Kardashians and think the Earth is 6,000 years old, too.
Robert McDougal
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Robert McDougal,
User Rank: Ninja
5/29/2014 | 2:55:59 PM
Re: Definitely the right thing!
You are correct, if I sign a non-disclosure agreement with a company and walk away with trade secrets, I would have broken the law.  However, let me pose a hypothetical situation to you.

Let's say I sign a contract and a NDA with a company to make bootleg Blu-Rays.  Although I signed both a contract and an NDA neither of which are valid since the basis of the business is illegal.  This is referred to as an illegal agreement and is not enforceable in a court.

Translating this example into the Snowden case, if the US government is willfully violating the fourth amendment, the Wiretap act, and several other laws then any contracts signed protecting the existence of the said operation are null and void.

 
Robert McDougal
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Robert McDougal,
User Rank: Ninja
5/29/2014 | 2:41:00 PM
Re: Snowden is a traitor
I don't follow your logic when it comes to elected officials being the ones that misuse the data collected by the NSA.  I may have missed something but I don't recall seeing a report stating that Congress is utilizing the data collected by the NSA for any purpose.  To the contrary, the NSA will not deny that they are spying on members of congress. Additionally the CIA appears to have been caught manipulating data on the computers used by on elected officials.

Also, just because the phone companies already store the information isn't a valid justification for allowing the government access to the data.  On the contrary, the Wiretap act of 1968 (expanded in 1986 to include electronic communication) prohibits the disclosure of that information.  Additionally, the Wiretap act states that providors (Telcos, etc) are allowed to view this data only if it is in the normal course of their duties and that they "shall not utilize service observing or random monitoring except for mechanical or service quality control checks".

Wiretap Act

 

 
JohnF555
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JohnF555,
User Rank: Apprentice
5/29/2014 | 1:40:55 PM
Not a Whistleblower...
Snowden was not a whistleblower - he's a rat bastard criminal - full stop. What he did was a criminal act - if it was legitimate whistleblowing, way is he hiding (and aiding and abetting) with the Russians? There is more oversight, audit and checking process conducted at NSA than you could possibly imagine...I'd commend this article if you have an interest in knowing the actual state of affairs.

http://www.afr.com/Page/Uuid/b67d7b3e-d570-11e3-90e8-355a30324c5f
TerryB
75%
25%
TerryB,
User Rank: Ninja
5/29/2014 | 1:07:20 PM
Re: Definitely the right thing!
@PacoCW3  People like you are the problem, the ones that like to get led around by the nose by authority and not have to think for themselves. People like you are exactly why a Nazi Germany could eliminate Jews. You were a "criminal" in that country if you tried to help them, that was the law.

Even this country used to say it was OK to have slaves. Being the law and being the right thing to do are two totally different things.

That fact you are still so naive to think this government in US even works anymore shows just how out of touch you are. The entire system is out of control, no one is fixing anything from the inside.

I applaud Snowden for doing what he thought was right. Whether you think it is right is irrelevant, he could care less. Point is, this act was not carried out to improve his personal status in life. No one can make that argument, even closed minded people like yourself. He gave up money, the country where he lives, his family, etc to let Americans know what was going on. None of this was motivated by personal gain for him.

Your comparison to stealing trade secrets in Silicon Valley is ridiculous. If I worked in Silicon Valley with non disclose but found out iPhones were made from stealing babies and turning them into oil, you think my non disclosure would matter? Grow a pair and quit depending on government to think for you. Otherwise you'll be saying "Heil Hitler" again before you know it.
Andre Leonard
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Andre Leonard,
User Rank: Strategist
5/29/2014 | 12:39:58 PM
Re: Definitely the right thing!
Robert, all your observations are spot-on. Your rational and reasoning ring true for those with an open mind. The truth well told.

There will always be dissenters on this issue of freedom and liberty and those are the ones that got us into this mess. For me and others who believe the governments actions to be egregious. Keep in mind the truth well told is seldom welcome. Many people just cannot handle the truth.  

 

http://www.pbs.org/wgbh/pages/frontline/government-elections-politics/united-states-of-secrets/how-the-nsas-secret-elite-hacking-unit-works/
PacoCW3
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PacoCW3,
User Rank: Guru
5/29/2014 | 12:23:57 PM
Re: Definitely the right thing!
He was wrong.  He broke the law.  Breaking the law makes one a criminal.  This is fact. Majority of Americans do not think Showden did the right thing.  This article is biased, based on those who you chose to provide opinion polls.

If one wants to discuss ethics or morality and the laws there is ability for this discussion, because we are a republic.  The power of America is we can discuss and adjust, remove or write laws that are seen as unjust, unethical, and so not right, or are needed to make the situation right. 

Legislators, freely elected, voted for those laws some of our citizenry are rallying against.  He broke the present law.  He signed legally binding non-disclosure agreement with our government. Potentially the methods used for data copying were also illegal.  Who's optical media was used? His personal or those he stole and from whom.

If he signed non-disclosure agreements with a "silicon valley" tech firm and walked off with "trade secrets" would he be a law breaker or not?   If you don't like our Country's or State or City's laws or how your think parts of the governmental organization operates, change is on you.  Become a Manager.  Become a Legislator.  Change from the inside is often the best longest last positive and effective change.  Change through mob mentality is often in the end, more problematic.
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