Dark Reading is part of the Informa Tech Division of Informa PLC

This site is operated by a business or businesses owned by Informa PLC and all copyright resides with them.Informa PLC's registered office is 5 Howick Place, London SW1P 1WG. Registered in England and Wales. Number 8860726.

Comments
FBI Seeks License To Hack Bot-Infected PCs
Newest First  |  Oldest First  |  Threaded View
Page 1 / 2   >   >>
Stephen@STSCORP
[email protected],
User Rank: Apprentice
5/13/2014 | 5:08:05 PM
Re: Criminally dumb
"How is it different from someone allowing through negligence a piece of physical property -- say an empty house --  to be used as a base for criminal activity? "

I think it differs just a bit. In, that the data on someone's machine would be picked through thoroughly compared to a physical check of someone's property where they'd lift the machine from one's home, and not bother to check the fridge, sink, cabinets and so on.
speshul
speshul,
User Rank: Strategist
5/13/2014 | 12:27:35 PM
Re: Criminally dumb
Personally I believe anyone who is in an I.T. position needs to know how the attacks work. I got into I.T. by being hacked as a teenager, and simply asking the hacker how he did it. At the time it seemed like a hack, but all it simply was was a program that logged several thousand yahoo accounts in at a time and would send me freeze codes that would lock my computer up. After I knew how it worked, I simply blocked messages from everyone that wasn't on my friends list. This is how you learn to deal with attacks and block them.

 

EVERY I.T. person should have to go through training that teaches them how these attacks work and operate and the usual methods used. I can't count how many times I've worked with other I.T. reps and they are completely clueless as to how people hack and attack networks and computers. They simply don't know any of the steps or how they're performed. In a world that is dominated by computers, and is rampant with viruses and malware... this should be a requirement in the I.T. field. Even for normal help desk users. So when they see the signs, they can start to immediately react and minimize the effects.
Marilyn Cohodas
Marilyn Cohodas,
User Rank: Strategist
5/13/2014 | 11:44:51 AM
Re: Criminally dumb
Thanks for the original PDF from Steve Gibson and Gibson Research Corporation. Your point is well taken and stilll very instructive 13 years after the fact.
GonzSTL
GonzSTL,
User Rank: Ninja
5/13/2014 | 11:36:00 AM
Re: Criminally dumb
@Marilyn Cohodas I've been teaching Information Security for over 10 years, and the Steve Gibson story is one I use frequently, especially to stress that internet attacks are nothing new, and are quite simple to orchestrate. After all, one cannot defend against these threats unlless one knows its anatomy. The link at the end contains the full story, including the analysis of the botnet and the C&C communications with the botnet. Frightening stuff when you see how simple a DDOS attack really is. http://www.crime-research.org/library/grcdos.pdf
speshul
speshul,
User Rank: Strategist
5/13/2014 | 11:04:43 AM
Re: too much access?
You've hit it. It seems to me that with the internet right now America is reacting like after September 11th. Willing to toss individual liberties and rights in order to "Stop the bad guys". The problem is that it's come to our attention that our own government is often the bad guys.

 

The issue right now is that this isn't getting enough coverage due to the Net Nuetrality being the main focus right now. Stuff like this should be just as important and talked about just as badly. Seeking for more power and less oversight hasn't been good for us EVER when it comes to the internet and our government. Actions speak louder than words, and their actions have clearly yelled they can't be trusted.
SgS125
SgS125,
User Rank: Ninja
5/13/2014 | 10:45:02 AM
too much access?
I guess it's about time they charge Target with a criminal charge then, as they had the empty house that the criminals used to run a malware botnet that scarpped off credit cards of innocent shoppers?

Is it about who owns the house or is it about who commits the crime?

If the federal investigators want to find and bring down botnets, how can they do so without accessing computers all over the internet?  Why would other countries allow our federal authorities to grab systems from within their borders?  Why we would we allow federal authorities to grab our systems as well?

For me there are many more questions about this issue than answers.

Sure it sounds great when we talk about shutting down online criminals, but at what cost to our privacy?  Surely there is a way to operate effectivly without stomping on an individuals rights to privavcy.

If an investigative reporter like Brain Krebs can track down and alert authorities to issues, why can't the federal government?

 

 

 

 
speshul
speshul,
User Rank: Strategist
5/13/2014 | 10:39:56 AM
Re: Criminally dumb
It's different because you can physically see the criminals. With computers, they can be completely invisible. That's like getting mad at people in the movie Harry Potter for not being able to see him with his invisibility cloak on. Your excuse for the government lacks any real reason to spy on average citizens who aren't as tech savy as I.T. professionals. Most of our society is so innadequate at technology that stores like Geek Squad and such can overcharge for simple virus removals. Most people just don't know any better.

 

The problem is that our government has been caught installing malware on systems.

http://www.techdirt.com/articles/20131124/20304025345/nsa-has-50000-computer-botnet-secretly-installing-malware-around-globe.shtml

 

Now suddenly they need to fix the malware and hacking problem? So basically they create a system that targets all users and installs malware. THEN they go and say, "Hey you've got malware installed, we need to look at what's going on." Your information and logs are dumped onto their servers and looked through with programs. Your personal information is stored on their servers, WITHOUT your knowledge or comitting a crime. They're creating the criminal actions, then creating a defense against it... all to resume spying. This is honestly a rookie hacking move, and anyone with some real knowledge of networking and computers can see through this rouse. If you can't, then you don't deserve to be able to touch a computer while waving your finger calling people criminally dumb.
Marilyn Cohodas
Marilyn Cohodas,
User Rank: Strategist
5/13/2014 | 10:35:17 AM
Re: Criminally dumb
You've got a good memory, @GonzSTL! Here's a link to the reference to Steve Gibson, per a June 2001 story in theguardian.com, "Teenage Clicks." 
GonzSTL
GonzSTL,
User Rank: Ninja
5/13/2014 | 10:01:45 AM
Re: Criminally dumb
Completely agree! Steve Gibson did a similar thing years ago when his site was taken down by a teenager. He may still have the complete analysis on his website. By infiltrating the botnet and C&C, he saw exactly what kind of communication was transpiring between the bots and the command center.

The scary part of this request is the desire to copy electronic data residing on an infected computer. Imagine what kind of personal and financial information they will harvest from this operation.
Whoopty
Whoopty,
User Rank: Ninja
5/13/2014 | 6:35:12 AM
More of the same
As if Federal authorities needed more clearance to access the personal data of citizens and foreign nationals. Botnet infected PCs are often unsuspecting end users, not those that are deliberately part of a regime of nefarious hackers. 

This will simply mean that anyone who's been infected by malware is a more legitimate target than ever for federal spying. 
Page 1 / 2   >   >>


Edge-DRsplash-10-edge-articles
I Smell a RAT! New Cybersecurity Threats for the Crypto Industry
David Trepp, Partner, IT Assurance with accounting and advisory firm BPM LLP,  7/9/2021
News
Attacks on Kaseya Servers Led to Ransomware in Less Than 2 Hours
Robert Lemos, Contributing Writer,  7/7/2021
Commentary
It's in the Game (but It Shouldn't Be)
Tal Memran, Cybersecurity Expert, CYE,  7/9/2021
Register for Dark Reading Newsletters
White Papers
Video
Cartoon
Current Issue
Black Hat USA 2022 Attendee Report
Black Hat attendees are not sleeping well. Between concerns about attacks against cloud services, ransomware, and the growing risks to the global supply chain, these security pros have a lot to be worried about. Read our 2022 report to hear what they're concerned about now.
Flash Poll
Twitter Feed
Dark Reading - Bug Report
Bug Report
Enterprise Vulnerabilities
From DHS/US-CERT's National Vulnerability Database
CVE-2022-2390
PUBLISHED: 2022-08-12
Apps developed with Google Play Services SDK incorrectly had the mutability flag set to PendingIntents that were passed to the Notification service. As Google Play services SDK is so widely used, this bug affects many applications. For an application affected, this bug will let the attacker, gain th...
CVE-2022-2503
PUBLISHED: 2022-08-12
Dm-verity is used for extending root-of-trust to root filesystems. LoadPin builds on this property to restrict module/firmware loads to just the trusted root filesystem. Device-mapper table reloads currently allow users with root privileges to switch out the target with an equivalent dm-linear targe...
CVE-2022-2779
PUBLISHED: 2022-08-12
A vulnerability classified as critical was found in SourceCodester Gas Agency Management System. Affected by this vulnerability is an unknown functionality of the file /gasmark/assets/myimages/oneWord.php. The manipulation of the argument shell leads to unrestricted upload. The attack can be launche...
CVE-2022-38179
PUBLISHED: 2022-08-12
JetBrains Ktor before 2.1.0 was vulnerable to the Reflect File Download attack
CVE-2022-38180
PUBLISHED: 2022-08-12
In JetBrains Ktor before 2.1.0 the wrong authentication provider could be selected in some cases