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FBI Warning Highlights Healthcare's Security Infancy
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Kelly Jackson Higgins
50%
50%
Kelly Jackson Higgins,
User Rank: Strategist
4/29/2014 | 11:31:09 AM
same theme, different industry
So much of what I see and hear about healthcare lagging in security comes down to the same issues dogging enterprises in all industries: users not wanting security to get in the way of them doing their jobs, and orgs not able to get on top of striking that balance. There's still a lot of denial out there about risks & threats, but at the end of day, everyone seems a lot more concerned with doing their daily work first and thinking of security second (if at all). The problem with healthcare, of course, is that these orgs are handling very personal and highly sensitive information about patients.
Robert McDougal
100%
0%
Robert McDougal,
User Rank: Ninja
4/28/2014 | 10:16:53 AM
Re: HIPAA
I have spent a large portion of my career in Healthcare information security and I think I can shed some light on why HIPAA has been ineffective in securing the healthcare industry.  The issue is that in many large hospitals and healthcare facilities exists a culture of doctor worship.  In the organization I worked at there was a fear of upsetting the doctors by implementing security controls and procedures required by HIPAA, FISMA, and meaningful use.  As a result, if a doctor didn't want a specific control implemented, our administration wouldn't push the issue, even though we were required by law to have the control in place.
RyanSepe
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50%
RyanSepe,
User Rank: Ninja
4/27/2014 | 9:48:48 AM
Working in Healthcare
I have seen many of the issues delineated in the article working in a Healthcare Network. We are trying to limit the scope of physical access through virtualization and restrictive controls. BYOD still provides a large issue but we are defining policies that are going to allow us to succesfully incorporate an EMM. Other security measures that have been taken in my organization include web filtering, DLP, and IPS/IDS. We are not a large security group and I recognize that healthcare is behind but what steps can be taken to close these gaps?
MarciaNWC
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50%
MarciaNWC,
User Rank: Apprentice
4/25/2014 | 7:58:07 PM
HIPAA
The HIPAA security rule has been around for years, so it's discouraging that so many health care companies lag when it comes to information security. But as is noted in this article, HIPAA didn't offer much in the way of prescriptive rules.


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