Dark Reading is part of the Informa Tech Division of Informa PLC

This site is operated by a business or businesses owned by Informa PLC and all copyright resides with them.Informa PLC's registered office is 5 Howick Place, London SW1P 1WG. Registered in England and Wales. Number 8860726.

Comments
How A Little Obscurity Can Bolster Security
Newest First  |  Oldest First  |  Threaded View
<<   <   Page 3 / 3
gkchat
50%
50%
gkchat,
User Rank: Apprentice
4/17/2014 | 10:29:24 AM
slows down an attack -- so it helps
It seems like you are reacting to the overuse of a good idea.  The good idea is that you have to put your energy into fixing the basic security of your system and NOT rely on obscurity.  A determined bad guy will still find your changed port number, or the name of your administrator group.

In my security training, we were taught not to give away any unnessary information that tells an attacker how the system works.  That header information you mention would be a big no-no.  So are exception traces that emit to the end-user.  Error messages are there to help the user, but should avoid giving away too much system design information.  One might argue that this is also security by obscurity.  I would disagree.  A system might have many vulnerabilities that are 'unknown' until an attack is crafted that bypasses the security I've set up.  The less I tell an attacker about my system, the less likely that they can find those 'open' doors between the time an attack is discovered and the time I can patch my system.

We sometimes tend to forget that our 'bad guys' are using computers too.  They have invested in automation and the more we 'follow convention', the easier it is for them to try their 'key' in thousands of virtual doors.
Marilyn Cohodas
50%
50%
Marilyn Cohodas,
User Rank: Strategist
4/17/2014 | 10:10:49 AM
Good examples but do they work?
Thanks for those simple obfuscations, Corey. Wondering if you've tried them out in practice.
<<   <   Page 3 / 3


COVID-19: Latest Security News & Commentary
Dark Reading Staff 7/6/2020
Ripple20 Threatens Increasingly Connected Medical Devices
Kelly Sheridan, Staff Editor, Dark Reading,  6/30/2020
DDoS Attacks Jump 542% from Q4 2019 to Q1 2020
Dark Reading Staff 6/30/2020
Register for Dark Reading Newsletters
White Papers
Video
Cartoon
Current Issue
How Cybersecurity Incident Response Programs Work (and Why Some Don't)
This Tech Digest takes a look at the vital role cybersecurity incident response (IR) plays in managing cyber-risk within organizations. Download the Tech Digest today to find out how well-planned IR programs can detect intrusions, contain breaches, and help an organization restore normal operations.
Flash Poll
The Threat from the Internetand What Your Organization Can Do About It
The Threat from the Internetand What Your Organization Can Do About It
This report describes some of the latest attacks and threats emanating from the Internet, as well as advice and tips on how your organization can mitigate those threats before they affect your business. Download it today!
Twitter Feed
Dark Reading - Bug Report
Bug Report
Enterprise Vulnerabilities
From DHS/US-CERT's National Vulnerability Database
CVE-2020-15505
PUBLISHED: 2020-07-07
MobileIron Core and Connector before 10.3.0.4, 10.4.x before 10.4.0.4, 10.5.x before 10.5.1.1, 10.5.2.x before 10.5.2.1, and 10.6.x before 10.6.0.1, and Sentry before 9.7.3 and 9.8.x before 9.8.1, allow remote attackers to execute arbitrary code via unspecified vectors.
CVE-2020-15506
PUBLISHED: 2020-07-07
MobileIron Core and Connector before 10.3.0.4, 10.4.x before 10.4.0.4, 10.5.x before 10.5.1.1, 10.5.2.x before 10.5.2.1, and 10.6.x before 10.6.0.1 allow remote attackers to bypass authentication mechanisms via unspecified vectors.
CVE-2020-15507
PUBLISHED: 2020-07-07
MobileIron Core and Connector before 10.3.0.4, 10.4.x before 10.4.0.4, 10.5.x before 10.5.1.1, 10.5.2.x before 10.5.2.1, and 10.6.x before 10.6.0.1 allow remote attackers to read files on the system via unspecified vectors.
CVE-2020-15096
PUBLISHED: 2020-07-07
In Electron before versions 6.1.1, 7.2.4, 8.2.4, and 9.0.0-beta21, there is a context isolation bypass, meaning that code running in the main world context in the renderer can reach into the isolated Electron context and perform privileged actions. Apps using &quot;contextIsolation&quot; are affecte...
CVE-2020-4075
PUBLISHED: 2020-07-07
In Electron before versions 7.2.4, 8.2.4, and 9.0.0-beta21, arbitrary local file read is possible by defining unsafe window options on a child window opened via window.open. As a workaround, ensure you are calling `event.preventDefault()` on all new-window events where the `url` or `options` is not ...