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Don't Blame It On The Web Programming Platform
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GonzSTL
GonzSTL,
User Rank: Ninja
4/16/2014 | 10:06:34 AM
Re: It all starts with the C-Level
I would extend that notion to state that the C-suite must regard all of IT security as a vital part of their organization. If that is the case, then security becomes integrated in every aspect of the organization. Nothing breaks down barriers and objections faster than the knowledge that any initiative or idea is driven down from the top. The key is conveying the message to the C-suite that IT security is vital. There are many organizations that still treat IT security as an afterthought. Look at the breached companies and you will likely find that it is sadly, and frighteningly true.
Kelly Jackson Higgins
Kelly Jackson Higgins,
User Rank: Strategist
4/16/2014 | 8:36:15 AM
Re: It all starts with the C-Level
What you said about the C-level suite not educating programmers on writing secure code is key, @anon6230542982. It's also a cultural issue among coders that somehow needs to be shaken up. As Chris Eng said, "People are not picking languages based on security implications. That's true and will continue to be true. It's where developers have skillsets and what can get the functionality done," Eng says. "Security is going to be fifth or sixth on the list."
anon6230542982
anon6230542982,
User Rank: Apprentice
4/15/2014 | 9:40:20 PM
It all starts with the C-Level
Anyone in this industry knows that the development language is not the issue, that it is the implementation is the issue, and it all starts with the C suite.

When it comes to secure software development most organizations do the minimal effort required to meet some industry compliance standard such as PCI. They don't do it because they are trying to develop better software.

The C suite cares about one thing and one thing only, short term ROI. They are worried about their quarterly numbers and lack a long term strategy. If they did then they would know secure software development is commitment the whole company has to embrace not just development teams. Its a cultural change in how they do business and write their software.

I have seen company after company think that by performing dynamic and/or static security scans of their software they have implemented a secure software development program that is going to fix their problems. Yet they don't staff the information security teams with people who can validate the findings. They don't educate their developers on how to write secure code. They have no corporate software development policies. Those that do, their CxO has never reviewed any of the development standards to see if they comply with the development policies. They don't audit the development processes to see if they comply with the standards. Developers are left up to their own means to do whatever they want and are never questioned because the C suite would rather claim ignorance, blame technology for their lack of leadership rather than be accountable for something and make a real difference.

If you don't have a C level person in your company who is actively involved with your software development program, setting policies and holding management responsible for cutting corners to get the next version of your product out the door just so they can make their quarterly numbers then you will continue to produce insecure software and it will never get better.


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