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Heartbleed: Examining The Impact
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Marilyn Cohodas
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Marilyn Cohodas,
User Rank: Strategist
4/10/2014 | 4:27:47 PM
Assessing damage
Thanks for a fascinating article Tim.  Now that the bug has been identified, going forward I assume it will be easier to tell when a breach has occurred. Or not? 

 
Thomas Claburn
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Thomas Claburn,
User Rank: Ninja
4/10/2014 | 6:59:53 PM
Re: Assessing damage
Is there any consensus on the need to change passwords? I keep reading differing opinions.
tsapio
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50%
tsapio,
User Rank: Author
4/12/2014 | 8:35:59 AM
Re: Assessing damage
For maximum security assurance, you should patch all your servers, change all passwords, revoke and reissue all certificates, and consider the impact of everything served by vulnerable systems being compromised. Each company will have to make their own decisions in this regard. As I stated above, there is no way of telling what (if anything) has actually been compromised. It is one of the worst features of this attack, and there is no way to find out retroactively. If it passed through a vulnerable web server, it is potentially compromised.
tsapio
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50%
tsapio,
User Rank: Author
4/12/2014 | 8:32:38 AM
Re: Assessing damage
It is theoretically possible to determine by examining server logs that a possible attack has occurred. However, what has been compromised is still going to be almost impossible to determine since what is being compromised is contents of memory adjacent to the buffer that holds the normal heartbeat response. This information is not going to be logged under normal circumstances. It would be extremely memory intensive to do so, and very time consuming to analyze. My recommendation is to close off this hole because it is the easiest and safest course of action.
macker490
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50%
macker490,
User Rank: Ninja
4/13/2014 | 9:12:33 AM
Secure Computing in a Compromised World
the impact is less than you might think:   we all live in a heavilly compromised world due to years of poor practice.

 

i posted some notes on this here:

 

https://www.schneier.com/blog/archives/2014/04/friday_squid_bl_419.html#c5430516


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