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Emergency SSL/TLS Patching Under Way
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RyanSepe
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RyanSepe,
User Rank: Ninja
4/8/2014 | 2:56:14 PM
On the backend
This is very scary that this exploit has come to light. Especially since it is very difficult and will be extensive to make sure that this exploit is remediated based on some of the safeguards mentioned in the article. If you can spoof the server and step in as if you were that server from a malicious standpoint there is no end to the data that will be compromised. Also, does anyone know how this vulnerability came to be? Meaning I am sure there are many ways that a site can be checked for activity, what is it about the previous creation of the heartbeat extension that provided this hole?
Kelly Jackson Higgins
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Kelly Jackson Higgins,
User Rank: Strategist
4/8/2014 | 2:59:41 PM
Re: On the backend
That's a great question, @Ryan Sepe. I know it was an implementation flaw in OpenSSL. It would be interesting to know what exactly introduced the problem in that version 2 years ago.
securityaffairs
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securityaffairs,
User Rank: Ninja
4/8/2014 | 4:49:34 PM
Re: On the backend
Official voices referes to an implementation mistake ... but Snowden's revelations have sown the seeds of distrust. This is just the beginning.  The only certainty is that the flaw is very disconcerting ... and probably many Intelligence agencies have exploited it in the past.

 
Li Tan
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Li Tan,
User Rank: Apprentice
4/8/2014 | 10:20:47 PM
Re: On the backend
I fully agree - now we are in the era of risk and uncertainty. Somehow as the normal people, we have to ignore something on purpose. If I think over about how many people/agencies have found my personal data during various exploration, I feel really deterred and cannot sleep well.:-(
securityaffairs
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securityaffairs,
User Rank: Ninja
4/10/2014 | 3:15:31 PM
Re: On the backend
Let's analyze also the reply of principal web service providers. I made some tests and at 48 from the disclosure of the flaw the most popular website, and almost every bank has fixed the issue. This means that awareness machine has done a good job and that alerting on security and privacy issues is high

 
sidd_452
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sidd_452,
User Rank: Apprentice
4/9/2014 | 4:46:24 AM
OpenSSL TLS DTLS Heartbeat Extension
How important are the Antivirus Vendors in releasing the singatures for this vulnerablility as they use the webservers like apache?
Ed Moyle
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Ed Moyle,
User Rank: Apprentice
4/9/2014 | 8:24:29 AM
Tip of the iceberg IMHO
Heartbleed is, without question, an "earthshattering" bug.  However, it strikes me that there's still another shoe to drop.  What I mean by that is that OpenSSL is open source, right?  Tons of other developers use it: they link against it, copy/paste it, set up web services to incorporate it, etc.  

Remember the ASN1 parsing vulnerability from a few years back (http://www.securityfocus.com/bid/8732)?  Take a look at the list of products impacted and you'll see what I mean (the list goes on for page after page).  Why were so many products impacted?  Becuase that source was reused - and reused - and reused again.  We were literally dealing with that bug for a decade after the fact because that code was used in everything from embedded devices to medical equipment to ICS systems. 

So what really concerns me is less the population of web servers that this impacts - because, impactful as that is, they can at least upgrade fairly easily.  What really makes me nervous is what else is vulnerable that can't be upgraded quite so easily.  This code is in a lot of stuff, in particular embedded systems.  Mark my words -- we'll be deling with this one for a while.  
Marilyn Cohodas
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Marilyn Cohodas,
User Rank: Strategist
4/9/2014 | 8:38:28 AM
Change passwords and user names?
Many news reports are quoting secruity gurus who recommendi that anyone using the Web immediately change their user names and passwords, particularly on ecommerce and financial sites. Is that overkill or an appropriate response? 
jaingverda
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jaingverda,
User Rank: Moderator
4/9/2014 | 9:25:26 AM
Re: Change passwords and user names?
For once I don't think you can over stress the damage that has been done by this. As one write up put it we have no clue how long this could have been activily exploited. Changing passwords for everything would be great. Personally I know I am changing my passwords on anything that touches secure data ie finance, health history etc. Also I am going full tilt and finally getting last pass set up with the mobel app so I can have strong passwords for everything and doing the same for my family.

The other issue and it is germane to the discussion of the password reset is how to black list every single certification that was used during this time because we have to assume that they all have been compromised. I fear that were going to see a huge rise in man in the middle attacks here about a year or two from this.
Marilyn Cohodas
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Marilyn Cohodas,
User Rank: Strategist
4/9/2014 | 9:33:44 AM
Re: Change passwords and user names?
Thanks for sharing your personal response to to Heartbleed, @jaingverda. What is your organization doing about the certification blacklist issue? What options are you considering.

Curious to hear from other readers about their and concerns...
jaingverda
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jaingverda,
User Rank: Moderator
4/9/2014 | 9:50:02 AM
Re: Change passwords and user names?
@Marilyn cohodas, I believe we are re-issuing new certifications to all our domains right now as for the black listing; I am not sure I am trying to find out about that. It's not really in my perview with my job description.
Kelly Jackson Higgins
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Kelly Jackson Higgins,
User Rank: Strategist
4/9/2014 | 10:03:55 AM
Re: Change passwords and user names?
The catch, of course, is getting everyday users/consumers to understand or even know they should change their password after the affected websites update for the flaw, get new certs, etc. Hoping the website owners will alert users of this best practice, and that they won't just go from Password 12345 to Password 123456. 
jaingverda
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jaingverda,
User Rank: Moderator
4/9/2014 | 10:23:47 AM
Re: Change passwords and user names?
@Kelly Jackson Higgins, As a developer I find it appalling that companies are not instituting a password black list for the 100 most common passwords by now. We have it so you have mimum length and several casings but nothing concerning the most common passwords known. Do you have any ideas on why they would still be letting those be used?
Kelly Jackson Higgins
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Kelly Jackson Higgins,
User Rank: Strategist
4/9/2014 | 10:26:28 AM
Re: Change passwords and user names?
@jaingverda I was being facetious there. Most big-time sites would indeed have strong password enforcement. 
GonzSTL
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GonzSTL,
User Rank: Ninja
4/9/2014 | 8:06:01 PM
Re: Change passwords and user names?
So regarding certificates, the prudent procedure is to revoke the old certificate once a new one is generated and placed into production. That propagates into the CRL and the end user's browser (or application) sees that the old certificate has been revoked and is therefore invalid, and provide notification prior to or prevent further action.
Charlie Babcock
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Charlie Babcock,
User Rank: Ninja
4/9/2014 | 1:51:06 PM
A failure of the many eyes test
OpenSSL fails the many eyes test. The many participants of an open source project are supposed to detect a major bug before it has a chance to be launched and cause mischief. This is a major bug, and I don't see how someone in the project didn't think to try what the security lab did and discover it. 
Kelly Jackson Higgins
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Kelly Jackson Higgins,
User Rank: Strategist
4/9/2014 | 1:58:14 PM
Re: A failure of the many eyes test
This probably only scratches the surface of the kinds of flaws that will be found in SSL implemenations going forward. Encryption is more under the microsocope now.


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