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A Cyber History Of The Ukraine Conflict
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Marilyn Cohodas
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Marilyn Cohodas,
User Rank: Strategist
4/1/2014 | 7:21:05 AM
Re: Fascinating history lesson
That's quite a comprehensive and enlightening post, Pierluigi. Thank you for sharing it. I encourage readers to read the article in its entirety, but I'm reposting your conclusion, which is a worth keeping in mind as the situation continues to unfold:  

What to expect in the future? It's difficult to say. While diplomacy will continue to work, deep in cyber space the attacks will increase. It is premature to define the tensions in cyber space as a cyber war between Russia and Ukraine. On one side hackers who are pro-Ukraine will intensify their activities against Russian entities, while Russian cyber units and patriotic hackers will increase their offensives against Ukrainian opposites. I made a rapid tour on principal social media, andf I noted that on both sides there has started a misinformation campaign. On the one hand, Putin's supporters are publishing disconcerting stories and images about atrocities committed by Ukrainian forces in Crimea, and on the other side of Putin it is possible to read everything.


And also:

With the escalation of tensions in Crimea, the number of cyber attacks will sensibly increase, and there is the concrete risk that other critical infrastructure in the country will be impacted.

securityaffairs
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securityaffairs,
User Rank: Ninja
4/1/2014 | 4:06:14 AM
Re: Fascinating history lesson
Hi John,

excellent post. Let me share with you an analysis I made a few days before the Russian escalation.

http://resources.infosecinstitute.com/crimea-russian-cyber-strategy-hit-ukraine/

The situation is very active in the cyberspace, especially for the hacktivism underground. Unfortunatelly many groups, in my opinion have been already infiltrated. Attacking a foreign state system uncovering the operation behind the name of a new group of hacktivists could be an excellent military option.

No doubts ... the number of attacks will increase in the next weeks.

Thanks

Pierluigi
Marilyn Cohodas
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Marilyn Cohodas,
User Rank: Strategist
3/31/2014 | 2:44:03 PM
Re: Fascinating history lesson
Thanks, John. I hope you will keep us posted on this thread! 

-marilyn
johnbumgarner
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johnbumgarner,
User Rank: Apprentice
3/28/2014 | 5:03:22 PM
Re: Fascinating history lesson
Marilyn,

In this post I was trying to highlight a few incidents (e.g., cyber attacks) that were most likely not conducted by hacktivists.  I also thought that it was important to briefly mention the Estonian and Georgian cyber incidents. From a historical perspective those incidents and the current one in Ukraine have some interesting similarities, beyond Russian involvement.

Concerning the distributed denial-of-service (DDoS) attacks against Russian government websites. These DDoS attacks were most likely launched by pro-Ukrainian hacktivists and not by the government of Ukraine.  It's worth noting that the websites of NATO and the NATO Cooperative Cyber Defence Centre of Excellence (NATO CCD COE) were also disrupted by DDoS attacks. There's evidence that suggests that these latter cyber attacks were orchestrated by the Russian government.  

We should expect to see more cyber attacks if the situation in Ukraine deteriorates.

Cheers, John

Marilyn Cohodas
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Marilyn Cohodas,
User Rank: Strategist
3/27/2014 | 2:50:04 PM
Fascinating history lesson
Very interesting blog, John. thanks for enlightening us! Are the cyberattacks mostly one way --from Russia to Ukraine. Or is there a back and forth between both nations? The Christian Science Monitor has reported that Russian government sites were also hit with a powerful wave of denial-of-service attacks, which they said was "apparently in response to their cyberattacks on Ukrainian."


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