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Three Surefire Ways To Tick Off An Auditor
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TheRat
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TheRat,
User Rank: Apprentice
1/18/2012 | 3:52:21 PM
re: Three Surefire Ways To Tick Off An Auditor
While the auditor cited in comment #1 may be technically proficient, many are not. I am an auditor and consultant, and was previously a SA who was audited regularly. The majority of auditors I have encountered (almost always from the Big Four) have a limited understanding of "how the things work," and rely on generic checklists created by others who have never been operational.

Documentation, as stated in the article, is the key.
Bprince
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Bprince,
User Rank: Ninja
1/6/2012 | 11:15:13 PM
re: Three Surefire Ways To Tick Off An Auditor
@ readers: ever catch someone trying to cheat an audit? What were they doing and what was their excuse?
Brian Prince, InformationWeek/Dark Reading Comment Moderator


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