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IoT
6/26/2019
05:30 PM
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New Linux Worm Attacks IoT Devices

Silex has 'bricked' more than 2,000 Linux-based IoT devices so far.

A new Internet of Things (IoT) bricking worm — malware designed to permanently disable the hardware it infects — is hitting Linux-based devices, and it appears the culprit responsible for the attack is 14 years old. 

The new software, dubbed "Silex," is running across the Internet looking for Linux systems deployed with default admin credentials. Once it finds such a system, it overwrites all of the system's storage with random data, drops its firewall rules, removes its network configuration, and then restarts the system — effectively rendering the device useless.

Discovered by Larry Cashdollar, a vulnerability researcher and member of Akamai's Security Incident Response Team, the software is purely destructive; it captures no data and asks for no ransom. Researcher Ankit Anubhav traced the malware back to its origins and found the developer, who uses the online name "Light Leafon." According to Anubhav, the malware's author says that additional destructive capabilities are planned for future Silex variants.

More than 2,000 systems have already been damaged by Silex, which is not technically limited to IoT devices. It could attack any Linux system deployed on the Internet with open telnet ports and default admin credentials. Other researchers have noted that the command-and-control servers for Silex have IP addresses linked to Iran, leading some to speculate that political, as well as simply destructive, aims are behind its release.

Read more herehere, and here.

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Webtoolsoffers
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Webtoolsoffers,
User Rank: Apprentice
6/28/2019 | 4:31:00 AM
Re: Linux Worm Exploits and Defenses
The IoT devices related to the internet. Now-a-day IoT devices is most useful because we can get information through mobile interenet
tdsan
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tdsan,
User Rank: Ninja
6/27/2019 | 2:52:55 PM
Linux Worm Exploits and Defenses
The new software, dubbed "Silex," is running across the Internet looking for Linux systems deployed with default admin credentials. Once it finds such a system, it overwrites all of the system's storage with random data, drops its firewall rules, removes its network configuration, and then restarts the system — effectively rendering the device useless.

I do agree the responsibility should rest with the consumer where the system asks or provides insight on how to change the admin password but this should be a mandatory function (to change the password and remove telnet or disable it) when the user logs in. A number of companies are doing this but after reading the report, it seems this practice is not performed across the board.

 
It could attack any Linux system deployed on the Internet with open telnet ports and default admin credentials.

Ways to thwart the linux attack:
  • iptables -I INPUT 1 -m multiport --dport 23 -s 0.0.0.0/0 -m conntrack --ctstate NEW,ESTABLISHED,RELATED -j DROP (the code can be updated to include more ports (-m option), conntrack tracks the attempts and the --ctstate looks for NEW, ESTABLISHED and Relates sessions, the -J is used to drop the connection)
  • ufw deny in -proto tcp from 0.0.0.0/0 to 0.0.0.0/0 port 23 "comment Deny telnet access" or a shorter method is ufw deny in telnet.
  • Firewall - disable telnet from the IOT device or only allow internal access when needed if telnet is essential to diagnostic issues
  • Another option would be to stop the service all together
service stop telnet-server or systemctl stop telnet-server

 

Shodan provides a complete list of devices that still have default passwords enabled.

 Todd

 
<<   <   Page 2 / 2
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