Dark Reading is part of the Informa Tech Division of Informa PLC

This site is operated by a business or businesses owned by Informa PLC and all copyright resides with them.Informa PLC's registered office is 5 Howick Place, London SW1P 1WG. Registered in England and Wales. Number 8860726.

IoT

New Arm Certification Aims to Secure IoT Devices

A three-tier certification regimen shows adherence to the Platform Security Architecture.

Arm, which designs processors used in devices from smart doorbells to supercomputers, is partnering with five laboratories and consulting firms to develop a certification for adherence to the Platform Security Architecture (PSA). The PSA is a framework and set of resources designed to help improve the security of Internet of Things (IoT) devices starting with the processing chips themselves.

PSA Certified offers three levels of certification in an attempt to prove basic security principles have been embedded in IoT hardware.

"This will enable trust in individual devices, in their data, and in the deployment of these devices at scale in IoT services, as we drive towards a world of a trillion connected devices," said Paul Williamson, vice president and general manager of Arm's Emerging Businesses Group, in a statement announcing the certification.

Level 1 certification involves a questionnaire for the manufacturer seeking certification, with the precise contents of the form varying depending on whether the component is a chip, device, operating system, or something else. The questionnaire is based on the 10 security model goals of the PSA architecture and is used, along with a lab check at one of the PSA-certified lab partners, or ensure compliance.

According to Arm, a number of manufacturers have attained Level 1 certification. They include Cypress, Express Logic, Microchip, Nordic Semiconductor, Nuvoton, NXP, STMicroelectronics, and Silicon Labs. 

Levels 2 and 3 certification require lab tests against the PSA root of trust protection profile; Level 3 also includes additional tests involving side-channel attacks and other vulnerabilities. These levels are intended for CPU and chip vendors to prove that their devices can be trusted as the basis of secure systems. These tests will be provided by testing lab partners Brightsight, CAICT, Riscure, and UL, along with consultants Prove&Run.

For a growing number of consumers and businesses, IoT security is a critical component of personal and financial security. In the "Avast Smart Home Security Report 2019," released today, researchers note that more than 40% of homes worldwide — and 62% of homes in the US, have more than five connected smart devices.

"It only takes one weak device to let in a bad hacker, and once they are on the network, they can access other devices and the personal data they stream or store, including live videos and voice recordings," said Avast president Ondrej Vlcek, commenting on the report.

Related Content:

 

 

 

Join Dark Reading LIVE for two cybersecurity summits at Interop 2019. Learn from the industry's most knowledgeable IT security experts. Check out the Interop agenda here.

Curtis Franklin Jr. is Senior Editor at Dark Reading. In this role he focuses on product and technology coverage for the publication. In addition he works on audio and video programming for Dark Reading and contributes to activities at Interop ITX, Black Hat, INsecurity, and ... View Full Bio

Comment  | 
Print  | 
More Insights
Comments
Newest First  |  Oldest First  |  Threaded View
Joe Stanganelli
50%
50%
Joe Stanganelli,
User Rank: Ninja
2/26/2019 | 11:03:59 PM
standards standards standards
ETSI just released a set of global consumer-IoT security standards themselves.

Many in the industry have been complaining about the lack of standards. I suspect that in two years' time the complaints will be about too many standards.
Aviation Faces Increasing Cybersecurity Scrutiny
Kelly Jackson Higgins, Executive Editor at Dark Reading,  8/22/2019
Microsoft Tops Phishers' Favorite Brands as Facebook Spikes
Kelly Sheridan, Staff Editor, Dark Reading,  8/22/2019
Capital One Breach: What Security Teams Can Do Now
Dr. Richard Gold, Head of Security Engineering at Digital Shadows,  8/23/2019
Register for Dark Reading Newsletters
White Papers
Video
Cartoon
Current Issue
7 Threats & Disruptive Forces Changing the Face of Cybersecurity
This Dark Reading Tech Digest gives an in-depth look at the biggest emerging threats and disruptive forces that are changing the face of cybersecurity today.
Flash Poll
The State of IT Operations and Cybersecurity Operations
The State of IT Operations and Cybersecurity Operations
Your enterprise's cyber risk may depend upon the relationship between the IT team and the security team. Heres some insight on what's working and what isn't in the data center.
Twitter Feed
Dark Reading - Bug Report
Bug Report
Enterprise Vulnerabilities
From DHS/US-CERT's National Vulnerability Database
CVE-2019-15540
PUBLISHED: 2019-08-25
filters/filter-cso/filter-stream.c in the CSO filter in libMirage 3.2.2 in CDemu does not validate the part size, triggering a heap-based buffer overflow that can lead to root access by a local Linux user.
CVE-2019-15538
PUBLISHED: 2019-08-25
An issue was discovered in xfs_setattr_nonsize in fs/xfs/xfs_iops.c in the Linux kernel through 5.2.9. XFS partially wedges when a chgrp fails on account of being out of disk quota. xfs_setattr_nonsize is failing to unlock the ILOCK after the xfs_qm_vop_chown_reserve call fails. This is primarily a ...
CVE-2016-6154
PUBLISHED: 2019-08-23
The authentication applet in Watchguard Fireware 11.11 Operating System has reflected XSS (this can also cause an open redirect).
CVE-2019-5594
PUBLISHED: 2019-08-23
An Improper Neutralization of Input During Web Page Generation ("Cross-site Scripting") in Fortinet FortiNAC 8.3.0 to 8.3.6 and 8.5.0 admin webUI may allow an unauthenticated attacker to perform a reflected XSS attack via the search field in the webUI.
CVE-2019-6695
PUBLISHED: 2019-08-23
Lack of root file system integrity checking in Fortinet FortiManager VM application images of all versions below 6.2.1 may allow an attacker to implant third-party programs by recreating the image through specific methods.