Dark Reading is part of the Informa Tech Division of Informa PLC

This site is operated by a business or businesses owned by Informa PLC and all copyright resides with them.Informa PLC's registered office is 5 Howick Place, London SW1P 1WG. Registered in England and Wales. Number 8860726.

IoT
8/3/2018
12:00 PM
50%
50%

FBI Offers New IoT Security Tips

A new article from the FBI offers insight into IoT risks and ways to reduce them.

Following the FBI's May request to router owners to reboot their devices, the bureau has released a "Security Tip" about risks associated with the Internet of Things (IoT). Included among suggestions to be alert to unusual increases in network traffic and reminders about the wisdom of firmware updates are statements regarding the importance of the IoT and the true nature of the risks involved.

Security professionals, who likely won't find anything surprising in the tips, might want to share the document with non-IT employees. The article, which begins with a statement that IoT devices are defined by their ability to " ... talk to other machines and trigger additional actions," briefly walks through the dangers posed by these connected devices and the data they can access.

The suggestions offered are basic but important, and could require help from IT staff for employees to implement. For organizations in which employees work from home, the FBI's latest security primer can be the start of a valuable conversation.

Read here and here for more.

 

 

 

Black Hat USA returns to Las Vegas with hands-on technical Trainings, cutting-edge Briefings, Arsenal open-source tool demonstrations, top-tier security solutions and service providers in the Business Hall. Click for information on the conference and to register.

Dark Reading's Quick Hits delivers a brief synopsis and summary of the significance of breaking news events. For more information from the original source of the news item, please follow the link provided in this article. View Full Bio

Comment  | 
Print  | 
More Insights
Comments
Oldest First  |  Newest First  |  Threaded View
44% of Security Threats Start in the Cloud
Kelly Sheridan, Staff Editor, Dark Reading,  2/19/2020
Zero-Factor Authentication: Owning Our Data
Nick Selby, Chief Security Officer at Paxos Trust Company,  2/19/2020
Register for Dark Reading Newsletters
White Papers
Video
Cartoon
Current Issue
6 Emerging Cyber Threats That Enterprises Face in 2020
This Tech Digest gives an in-depth look at six emerging cyber threats that enterprises could face in 2020. Download your copy today!
Flash Poll
How Enterprises Are Developing and Maintaining Secure Applications
How Enterprises Are Developing and Maintaining Secure Applications
The concept of application security is well known, but application security testing and remediation processes remain unbalanced. Most organizations are confident in their approach to AppSec, although others seem to have no approach at all. Read this report to find out more.
Twitter Feed
Dark Reading - Bug Report
Bug Report
Enterprise Vulnerabilities
From DHS/US-CERT's National Vulnerability Database
CVE-2015-0565
PUBLISHED: 2020-02-25
NaCl in 2015 allowed the CLFLUSH instruction, making rowhammer attacks possible.
CVE-2020-9393
PUBLISHED: 2020-02-25
An issue was discovered in the pricing-table-by-supsystic plugin before 1.8.2 for WordPress. It allows XSS.
CVE-2020-9394
PUBLISHED: 2020-02-25
An issue was discovered in the pricing-table-by-supsystic plugin before 1.8.2 for WordPress. It allows CSRF.
CVE-2019-3999
PUBLISHED: 2020-02-25
Improper neutralization of special elements used in an OS command in Druva inSync Windows Client 6.5.0 allows a local, unauthenticated attacker to execute arbitrary operating system commands with SYSTEM privileges.
CVE-2020-8809
PUBLISHED: 2020-02-25
Gurux GXDLMS Director prior to 8.5.1905.1301 downloads updates to add-ins and OBIS code over an unencrypted HTTP connection. A man-in-the-middle attacker can prompt the user to download updates by modifying the contents of gurux.fi/obis/files.xml and gurux.fi/updates/updates.xml. Then, the attacker ...