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IoT
3/15/2019
03:30 PM
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7 Low-Cost Security Tools

Security hardware doesn't have to be expensive or complex to do the job. Here are seven examples of low-cost hardware that could fill a need in your security operations.
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Dark Reading has looked at free and low-cost software for security. And we have pointed out low-cost and free ways to improve your security knowledge. Now we turn the spotlight on low-cost hardware, which offers a great option for those willing to invest a bit of time or accept some limitations in speed or functionality.

Low-cost security hardware can be purchased or built from single-board computers, to be used for reconnaissance, education, network security, or a combination of tasks. The odds are favorable that implementing one of the seven low-cost options we're about to present will teach you a thing or two about how security happens, too.

Our selections provide different aspects of security. You'll notice that the Raspberry Pi is seen often — it's hard to beat the board's combination of power, flexibility, and price. These hardware options can be found in forms that make experimentation, learning, and practical security for smaller networks or network segments much more affordable.

What low-cost options have you found? Share them in the Comments section, below.

(Image: BillionPhotos.com VIA Adobe Stock)

 

Curtis Franklin Jr. is Senior Analyst at Omdia, focusing on enterprise security management. Curtis has been writing about technologies and products in computing and networking since the early 1980s. He has been on staff and contributed to technology-industry publications ... View Full Bio
 

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