Dark Reading is part of the Informa Tech Division of Informa PLC

This site is operated by a business or businesses owned by Informa PLC and all copyright resides with them.Informa PLC's registered office is 5 Howick Place, London SW1P 1WG. Registered in England and Wales. Number 8860726.

Endpoint

5/7/2020
12:15 PM
100%
0%

Zoom Acquires Keybase, Plans for End-to-End Encrypted Chats

The company's first acquisition to date is part of a 90-day plan to improve security in its video communications platform.

Zoom has confirmed its acquisition of security company Keybase as part of its 90-day effort to strengthen protection in its communications platform. Terms of the deal were not disclosed.

This marks the first acquisition for 9-year-old Zoom, which has fallen under great scrutiny as more businesses rely on its technology to communicate while working from home. Zoom usage has surged during the coronavirus pandemic: By late April, more than 300 million people were on the platform, up from about 10 million in December, CNBC reports. As usage has spiked, so too have security concerns related to weaknesses in Zoom's video communications technology.

The Keybase acquisition is part of Zoom's plan to create a secure, private, and scalable video communications tool that businesses need as more employees work remotely. Keybase, founded in 2014, has spent six years building a secure messaging and file-sharing service. Users can chat and share with team members and communities knowing that messages are end-to-end encrypted. 

Zoom plans to bring this to its paid accounts, which will have end-to-end encrypted meeting mode. Logged-in users will generate public cryptographic identities, which will be stored in a repository on Zoom's network and used to establish trust between attendees. 

"An ephemeral per-meeting symmetric key will be generated by the meeting host," Yuan explains in a blog post. "This key will be distributed between clients, enveloped with the asymmetric keypairs and rotated when there are significant changes to the list of attendees." The host will control cryptographic secrets, and the host's client software will determine which devices can receive meeting keys and join. These end-to-end encrypted meetings won't support phone bridges, cloud recording, or non-Zoom conferencing systems.

As part of the deal, Keybase's team members will become Zoom employees. It's unclear how Zoom plans to use Keybase's technology or what will happen to Keybase's product. Yuan's post does note the company plans to publish a draft cryptographic design on Friday, May 22.

Read more details in Yuan's blog post.

Check out The Edge, Dark Reading's new section for features, threat data, and in-depth perspectives. Today's featured story: "Cybersecurity Home School: Garfield Teaches Security."

Dark Reading's Quick Hits delivers a brief synopsis and summary of the significance of breaking news events. For more information from the original source of the news item, please follow the link provided in this article. View Full Bio
 

Recommended Reading:

Comment  | 
Print  | 
More Insights
Comments
Newest First  |  Oldest First  |  Threaded View
COVID-19: Latest Security News & Commentary
Dark Reading Staff 9/21/2020
Cybersecurity Bounces Back, but Talent Still Absent
Simone Petrella, Chief Executive Officer, CyberVista,  9/16/2020
Meet the Computer Scientist Who Helped Push for Paper Ballots
Kelly Jackson Higgins, Executive Editor at Dark Reading,  9/16/2020
Register for Dark Reading Newsletters
White Papers
Video
Cartoon
Current Issue
Special Report: Computing's New Normal
This special report examines how IT security organizations have adapted to the "new normal" of computing and what the long-term effects will be. Read it and get a unique set of perspectives on issues ranging from new threats & vulnerabilities as a result of remote working to how enterprise security strategy will be affected long term.
Flash Poll
How IT Security Organizations are Attacking the Cybersecurity Problem
How IT Security Organizations are Attacking the Cybersecurity Problem
The COVID-19 pandemic turned the world -- and enterprise computing -- on end. Here's a look at how cybersecurity teams are retrenching their defense strategies, rebuilding their teams, and selecting new technologies to stop the oncoming rise of online attacks.
Twitter Feed
Dark Reading - Bug Report
Bug Report
Enterprise Vulnerabilities
From DHS/US-CERT's National Vulnerability Database
CVE-2020-25826
PUBLISHED: 2020-09-23
PingID Integration for Windows Login before 2.4.2 allows local users to gain privileges by modifying CefSharp.BrowserSubprocess.exe.
CVE-2020-25821
PUBLISHED: 2020-09-23
** UNSUPPORTED WHEN ASSIGNED ** peg-markdown 0.4.14 has a NULL pointer dereference in process_raw_blocks in markdown_lib.c. NOTE: This vulnerability only affects products that are no longer supported by the maintainer.
CVE-2020-3130
PUBLISHED: 2020-09-23
A vulnerability in the web management interface of Cisco Unity Connection could allow an authenticated remote attacker to overwrite files on the underlying filesystem. The vulnerability is due to insufficient input validation. An attacker could exploit this vulnerability by sending a crafted HTTP re...
CVE-2020-3133
PUBLISHED: 2020-09-23
A vulnerability in the email message scanning of Cisco AsyncOS Software for Cisco Email Security Appliance (ESA) could allow an unauthenticated, remote attacker to bypass configured filters on the device. The vulnerability is due to improper validation of incoming emails. An attacker could exploit t...
CVE-2020-3135
PUBLISHED: 2020-09-23
A vulnerability in the web-based management interface of Cisco Unified Communications Manager (UCM) could allow an unauthenticated, remote attacker to conduct a cross-site request forgery (CSRF) attack on an affected device. The vulnerability is due to insufficient CSRF protections for the web-based...