Dark Reading is part of the Informa Tech Division of Informa PLC

This site is operated by a business or businesses owned by Informa PLC and all copyright resides with them.Informa PLC's registered office is 5 Howick Place, London SW1P 1WG. Registered in England and Wales. Number 8860726.

Endpoint //

Privacy

1/25/2019
05:10 PM
Connect Directly
Twitter
RSS
E-Mail
50%
50%

Internet Society to Issue Privacy Code of Conduct

In time for Data Privacy Day, on Monday, the nine-point guidance will offer insights into how companies can more effectively manage personal data.

It's easy to be cynical about Data Privacy Day, especially with all the data that companies collect on individuals today. Some have even taken to calling Monday's special day of events Lack of Privacy Day.

Fear not. In time for Data Privacy Day, the Internet Society has issued a nine-point code of conduct that offers insights into how companies can more effectively manage personal data, including ways to improve how they handle anonymized data and keep consumers better informed on what they actually consented to releasing.

"People regard data as a commodity they can exploit, but they have to change to becoming a responsible steward of that data," says Christine Runnegar, senior director of Internet trust for the Internet Society. Companies have to change their mindset, she adds.

They also must be held accountable and stop using the consumer's consent to excuse bad practices, she says. For example, very often company websites will post long-winded forms at the bottom of the page written in legalese that people gloss over and accept.

"People often don't know what it means or what the risks are," Runnegar says. "Businesses have to offer a clearer explanation of what the personal data will be used for and make clear that it is for legitimate and reasonable purposes. They should follow up with written explanations in plain language of what the person actually consented to releasing."

There's good reason for the concern. TrackOff reports that 75% of the websites people visit collect information about them and, on average, that personal information gets sold for as low as less than three cents. Data brokers have expanded from collecting a person's browser history and email to making inferences about religious affiliations, credit card information, and even health issues.

But with GDPR in effect, the California Consumer Privacy Act coming on line next year, and Brazil and India focusing on privacy, companies and security pros can no longer ignore it and have to find ways to layer in privacy with security.  

Take Care of Anonymized Data
The Internet Society's code of conduct also makes clear that anonymized data should be treated as if it were personal data. A good example: A travel website may ask for your name, address, age, and frequent travel destinations. In anonymizing the data, the company may strip out the names and run an analysis on the age demographic of people who visit a certain destination. Today, companies often resell this information, but moving forward they need to think twice about doing so because there are ways to trace that data back to specific individuals.

"We also want companies to be creative and go above and beyond what the privacy laws require," Runnegar says. "A good example would be a secure messaging service that would only use your phone number to set up the account, then delete it after that so it can't be reused."

Jadee Hanson, CISO at Code42, says too many companies don't even know what kind of data they have, and, even if they do, they haven't set specific rules on who can use what data and how they will monitor that those rules will be followed.

"Once I have established what PII the company has, then I need to use security controls to set privacy settings for the two people who can have access to that data," Hanson explains. "Where companies fall down is they don't have any way to validate that the rules are being followed."

Related Content:

Steve Zurier has more than 30 years of journalism and publishing experience, most of the last 24 of which were spent covering networking and security technology. Steve is based in Columbia, Md. View Full Bio

Comment  | 
Print  | 
More Insights
Comments
Threaded  |  Newest First  |  Oldest First
REISEN1955
0%
100%
REISEN1955,
User Rank: Ninja
1/28/2019 | 8:11:14 AM
9 Points --- ???
It would be nice to have a subject link for the 9 points. 
szurier210
50%
50%
szurier210,
User Rank: Moderator
1/28/2019 | 8:14:06 AM
Re: 9 Points --- ???
Look for it later this morning, thanks for asking. 
REISEN1955
50%
50%
REISEN1955,
User Rank: Ninja
1/28/2019 | 9:02:31 AM
Re: 9 Points --- ???
Apologies - realized it read "will post later" than right now --- early morning at work, have to get more coffee.
7 Truths About BEC Scams
Ericka Chickowski, Contributing Writer,  6/13/2019
DNS Firewalls Could Prevent Billions in Losses to Cybercrime
Curtis Franklin Jr., Senior Editor at Dark Reading,  6/13/2019
Can Your Patching Strategy Keep Up with the Demands of Open Source?
Tim Mackey, Principal Security Strategist, CyRC, at Synopsys,  6/18/2019
Register for Dark Reading Newsletters
White Papers
Video
Cartoon
Current Issue
Building and Managing an IT Security Operations Program
As cyber threats grow, many organizations are building security operations centers (SOCs) to improve their defenses. In this Tech Digest you will learn tips on how to get the most out of a SOC in your organization - and what to do if you can't afford to build one.
Flash Poll
New Best Practices for Secure App Development
New Best Practices for Secure App Development
The transition from DevOps to SecDevOps is combining with the move toward cloud computing to create new challenges - and new opportunities - for the information security team. Download this report, to learn about the new best practices for secure application development.
Twitter Feed
Dark Reading - Bug Report
Bug Report
Enterprise Vulnerabilities
From DHS/US-CERT's National Vulnerability Database
CVE-2019-12881
PUBLISHED: 2019-06-18
i915_gem_userptr_get_pages in drivers/gpu/drm/i915/i915_gem_userptr.c in the Linux kernel 4.15.0 on Ubuntu 18.04.2 allows local users to cause a denial of service (NULL pointer dereference and BUG) or possibly have unspecified other impact via crafted ioctl calls to /dev/dri/card0.
CVE-2019-3953
PUBLISHED: 2019-06-18
Stack-based buffer overflow in Advantech WebAccess/SCADA 8.4.0 allows a remote, unauthenticated attacker to execute arbitrary code by sending a crafted IOCTL 10012 RPC call.
CVE-2019-12133
PUBLISHED: 2019-06-18
Multiple Zoho ManageEngine products suffer from local privilege escalation due to improper permissions for the %SYSTEMDRIVE%\ManageEngine directory and its sub-folders. Moreover, the services associated with said products try to execute binaries such as sc.exe from the current directory upon system ...
CVE-2019-12592
PUBLISHED: 2019-06-18
A universal Cross-site scripting (UXSS) vulnerability in the Evernote Web Clipper extension before 7.11.1 for Chrome allows remote attackers to run arbitrary web script or HTML in the context of any loaded 3rd-party IFrame.
CVE-2017-8328
PUBLISHED: 2019-06-18
An issue was discovered on Securifi Almond, Almond+, and Almond 2015 devices with firmware AL-R096. The device provides a user with the capability of changing the administrative password for the web management interface. It seems that the device does not implement any cross site request forgery prot...