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Privacy

7/11/2018
03:25 PM
50%
50%

Banks Suffer an Average of 3.8 Data Leak Incidents Per Week

New study examines how financial services information gets sold and shared in the Dark Web.

It's no secret that financial services organizations are juicy targets for cybercrime, but new data shows how much more the bad guys are stealing from them: in the past year, there's been a 135% jump in bank data for sale on the Dark Web. 

A new report from IntSights Cyber Intelligence shows financial services is the number one most-attacked industry: from 2017 until the first half of 2018, the security firm found an average of 207 indictators of attacks - such as company IPs, domains, email, and data included in Dark Web chatter, malware, or target lists - on a US bank. In the first half of this year, that average hit 520.

"Based on our data of leaked banking information, we saw a 135% year-over year increase in financial data being sold on dark web black markets. For the first six months of 2018, we’ve seen an average of 98.9 incidents of data leakage per bank. That translates to 3.8 incidents per week per bank," IntSights wrote in its report.

Read the full report here.  

 

 

 

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