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2/4/2019
02:00 PM
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Facebook Struggles in Privacy Class-Action Lawsuit

Facebook's privacy disclosures "are quite vague" and should have been made more prominent, a federal judge argued.

Facebook, in the midst of a class-action privacy lawsuit, was dealt a blow last week when US District Judge Vince Chhabria argued its privacy policies and practices cause users harm.

In a motion-to-dismiss hearing held Feb. 1, Facebook asked Chhabria to throw away a 267-page complaint from a multidistrict case that had sought billions in damages for the social giant's violations of state and federal laws. Facebook's attorney insisted the company had not broken the law because its users willingly let external parties collect data via their privacy controls.

However, Chhabria said Facebook's disclosures informing users of its data-sharing practices "are quite vague," as detailed in a Courthouse News Service report. Derek Loeser, an attorney representing a proposed class of Facebook users, argued that in order for the policy to be binding, people have to be properly informed before they consent to share their information.

"The injury is the disclosure of private information," said Chhabria in Friday's hearing.

Chhabria gave plaintiffs a chance to file an amended complaint within 21 days instead of first issuing a ruling in an effort to accelerate the litigation. Plaintiffs have agreed, saying they will add new data regarding a Facebook privacy settings change. The new complaint is due Feb. 22.

Read more details here.

 

 

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REISEN1955
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REISEN1955,
User Rank: Ninja
2/22/2019 | 6:58:52 AM
Re: Who is to be blamed?
There was a time when I had no FB account at all.  Nothing.  No one came into my office to put a gun against my head and ordered me to open one up.  I did it on my own and generally visit family, friends and people I NEVER thought to be in touch with again in this lifetime.  I am going back to pre-school classmates.  But my choice.  My choice to enter whatever personal data i put there.  My hands on the keyboard.  I have direct absolute control over what is entered into any online account by first contact.  After that, well, things fall apart.  But the number one culprit has to be he user.  Don't like FB?  You're not alone.  I hate Zucky-boy anyway.  So, delete your account.  Come on - i Dare you! 
CameronRobertson
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CameronRobertson,
User Rank: Moderator
2/22/2019 | 3:17:50 AM
All that espionage
Facebook has a lot to answer to in all of its recent security and privacy breaches. To think that all of that hoo-ha has been going on for so long before they actually confessed that they were aware of what was going on? If people haven't complained or brought to light that all of this was going on, can you imagine how much more of our information might have inadvertently be spread around?
MarkSindone
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MarkSindone,
User Rank: Apprentice
2/19/2019 | 8:49:25 PM
Who is to be blamed?
To be honest, who really thoroughly reads every single word of the terms and conditions of every platform we use? Even if Facebook did state in detailed its privacy clause to its members, I highly doubt that anyone would even bother to read it. Hence, who is to be blamed at the end of the day? The service provider or the users?
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