Dark Reading is part of the Informa Tech Division of Informa PLC

This site is operated by a business or businesses owned by Informa PLC and all copyright resides with them.Informa PLC's registered office is 5 Howick Place, London SW1P 1WG. Registered in England and Wales. Number 8860726.

Endpoint

2/4/2019
02:00 PM
50%
50%

Facebook Struggles in Privacy Class-Action Lawsuit

Facebook's privacy disclosures "are quite vague" and should have been made more prominent, a federal judge argued.

Facebook, in the midst of a class-action privacy lawsuit, was dealt a blow last week when US District Judge Vince Chhabria argued its privacy policies and practices cause users harm.

In a motion-to-dismiss hearing held Feb. 1, Facebook asked Chhabria to throw away a 267-page complaint from a multidistrict case that had sought billions in damages for the social giant's violations of state and federal laws. Facebook's attorney insisted the company had not broken the law because its users willingly let external parties collect data via their privacy controls.

However, Chhabria said Facebook's disclosures informing users of its data-sharing practices "are quite vague," as detailed in a Courthouse News Service report. Derek Loeser, an attorney representing a proposed class of Facebook users, argued that in order for the policy to be binding, people have to be properly informed before they consent to share their information.

"The injury is the disclosure of private information," said Chhabria in Friday's hearing.

Chhabria gave plaintiffs a chance to file an amended complaint within 21 days instead of first issuing a ruling in an effort to accelerate the litigation. Plaintiffs have agreed, saying they will add new data regarding a Facebook privacy settings change. The new complaint is due Feb. 22.

Read more details here.

 

 

Join Dark Reading LIVE for two cybersecurity summits at Interop 2019. Learn from the industry's most knowledgeable IT security experts. Check out the Interop agenda here.

Dark Reading's Quick Hits delivers a brief synopsis and summary of the significance of breaking news events. For more information from the original source of the news item, please follow the link provided in this article. View Full Bio
 

Recommended Reading:

Comment  | 
Print  | 
More Insights
Comments
Newest First  |  Oldest First  |  Threaded View
REISEN1955
100%
0%
REISEN1955,
User Rank: Ninja
2/22/2019 | 6:58:52 AM
Re: Who is to be blamed?
There was a time when I had no FB account at all.  Nothing.  No one came into my office to put a gun against my head and ordered me to open one up.  I did it on my own and generally visit family, friends and people I NEVER thought to be in touch with again in this lifetime.  I am going back to pre-school classmates.  But my choice.  My choice to enter whatever personal data i put there.  My hands on the keyboard.  I have direct absolute control over what is entered into any online account by first contact.  After that, well, things fall apart.  But the number one culprit has to be he user.  Don't like FB?  You're not alone.  I hate Zucky-boy anyway.  So, delete your account.  Come on - i Dare you! 
CameronRobertson
100%
0%
CameronRobertson,
User Rank: Moderator
2/22/2019 | 3:17:50 AM
All that espionage
Facebook has a lot to answer to in all of its recent security and privacy breaches. To think that all of that hoo-ha has been going on for so long before they actually confessed that they were aware of what was going on? If people haven't complained or brought to light that all of this was going on, can you imagine how much more of our information might have inadvertently be spread around?
MarkSindone
50%
50%
MarkSindone,
User Rank: Moderator
2/19/2019 | 8:49:25 PM
Who is to be blamed?
To be honest, who really thoroughly reads every single word of the terms and conditions of every platform we use? Even if Facebook did state in detailed its privacy clause to its members, I highly doubt that anyone would even bother to read it. Hence, who is to be blamed at the end of the day? The service provider or the users?
COVID-19: Latest Security News & Commentary
Dark Reading Staff 8/3/2020
Pen Testers Who Got Arrested Doing Their Jobs Tell All
Kelly Jackson Higgins, Executive Editor at Dark Reading,  8/5/2020
New 'Nanodegree' Program Provides Hands-On Cybersecurity Training
Nicole Ferraro, Contributing Writer,  8/3/2020
Register for Dark Reading Newsletters
White Papers
Video
Cartoon Contest
Current Issue
Special Report: Computing's New Normal, a Dark Reading Perspective
This special report examines how IT security organizations have adapted to the "new normal" of computing and what the long-term effects will be. Read it and get a unique set of perspectives on issues ranging from new threats & vulnerabilities as a result of remote working to how enterprise security strategy will be affected long term.
Flash Poll
The Changing Face of Threat Intelligence
The Changing Face of Threat Intelligence
This special report takes a look at how enterprises are using threat intelligence, as well as emerging best practices for integrating threat intel into security operations and incident response. Download it today!
Twitter Feed
Dark Reading - Bug Report
Bug Report
Enterprise Vulnerabilities
From DHS/US-CERT's National Vulnerability Database
CVE-2020-15058
PUBLISHED: 2020-08-07
Lindy 42633 4-Port USB 2.0 Gigabit Network Server 2.078.000 devices allow an attacker on the same network to elevate privileges because the administrative password can be discovered by sniffing unencrypted UDP traffic.
CVE-2020-15059
PUBLISHED: 2020-08-07
Lindy 42633 4-Port USB 2.0 Gigabit Network Server 2.078.000 devices allow an attacker on the same network to bypass authentication via a web-administration request that lacks a password parameter.
CVE-2020-15060
PUBLISHED: 2020-08-07
Lindy 42633 4-Port USB 2.0 Gigabit Network Server 2.078.000 devices allow an attacker on the same network to conduct persistent XSS attacks by leveraging administrative privileges to set a crafted server name.
CVE-2020-15061
PUBLISHED: 2020-08-07
Lindy 42633 4-Port USB 2.0 Gigabit Network Server 2.078.000 devices allow an attacker on the same network to denial-of-service the device via long input values.
CVE-2020-15062
PUBLISHED: 2020-08-07
DIGITUS DA-70254 4-Port Gigabit Network Hub 2.073.000.E0008 devices allow an attacker on the same network to elevate privileges because the administrative password can be discovered by sniffing unencrypted UDP traffic.